Artificial Intelligence, Marketing, and the Fourth Industrial Revolution: Criteria, Concerns, Cases

Artificial Intelligence, Marketing, and the Fourth Industrial Revolution: Criteria, Concerns, Cases

Andreas Kaplan (ESCP Business School, Germany)
DOI: 10.4018/978-1-7998-5077-9.ch001

Abstract

Artificial intelligence has been part of the world of marketing for some time now. This chapter will look at how artificial intelligence is defined and classified, illustrating its potential for the marketing domain with a variety of examples from various industries and sectors. Ethical concerns arising from the application of AI marketing will be discussed in the second part of this chapter. Before concluding, three brief case studies will give further insights, looking in detail at the AI activities of Airbnb, NYC's Metropolitan Museum of Artificial Intelligence, and retail giant Walmart.
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Criteria – A Review Of The Literature

Commonly defined as “a system’s ability to correctly interpret external data, to learn from such data, and to use those learnings to achieve specific goals and tasks through flexible adaptation” (Kaplan and Haenlein, 2019b, p. 17), artificial intelligence is categorized into analytical, human-inspired, and humanized AI (Kaplan and Haenlein, 2019b) based on its competencies and types of intelligence: cognitive intelligence (i.e., competencies related to systematic thinking and pattern recognition), emotional intelligence (i.e., achievement orientation adaptability, emotional self-awareness, self-confidence, etc.), and social intelligence (i.e., empathy, inspirational leadership, teamwork, and so forth). Each category will be explained and examples from the marketing domain will be given for the purpose of illustration.

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