Assessing the Effectiveness of Vocational Education and Training in Economic Development: A Comparison between Turkish and German Education Systems

Assessing the Effectiveness of Vocational Education and Training in Economic Development: A Comparison between Turkish and German Education Systems

Pinar Feyzioglu Akkoyunlu (Istanbul University, Turkey)
DOI: 10.4018/978-1-4666-9548-1.ch007
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Abstract

Education in general is considered and its effect on economic and human development is questioned via the Human Development Index criteria. Education as an investment to human capital is discussed. Secondly, the demand for highly skilled workers and the relation between employment and new technologies are analyzed. The high rate of unemployment of educated youth is a disadvantage for economic and social stability. The importance of vocational education in overcoming this unemployment problem is discussed. Third, the Turkish and German economies and education systems in particular are compared. In Turkey, there is an increase in the number of university graduates but also there is an increase in the number of unemployed educated young people. In this perspective school-based education, a dual system in which school-based education is combined with firm-based training and informal training is explained. The German system is investigated with a view to obtain clues for an efficient education system.
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Background

Education is a multidisciplinary subject, it has been analysed by social scientists from different perspectives. As this book emphasizes the links of global economy with Europe and the MENA region, this chapter provides an analysis of the importance of the vocational education and training in these intertwined relations. Lars Osberg’s index of economic well – being analysis (Osberg & Sharpe, 2011) is followed by UNDP Human Development reports to give the basic idea of the importance of investing in education. Amartya Sen’s capabilities approach, dated back to 1985, and Mahbub ul Haq’s definition of human development in the United Nations Development Program, 1990, are given (UNDP, 2010). Human development index data is investigated and the views of Gary Becker (1975), Theodore Schultz (1961), and Samuel Bowles (1969) on human capital are explained. Milton Friedman’s (1980) approach to educational institutions is underlined. Daron Acemoglu’s (2011) list of sources of human capital is given.

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