Assessment and Culturally Relevant Inclusive Education: The Case of Tanzania

Assessment and Culturally Relevant Inclusive Education: The Case of Tanzania

Angi Stone-MacDonald (University of Massachusetts – Boston, USA) and Japhari Robert Shehaghilo (Sebastian Kolowa Memorial University, Tanzania)
Copyright: © 2019 |Pages: 18
DOI: 10.4018/978-1-5225-7703-4.ch014

Abstract

In this chapter, the authors will describe a case study that illuminates assessment, identification, and inclusive educational practices in Tanzania. The key purposes of this chapter are to briefly describe the history of special needs education and policies and assessment practices in Tanzania, to examine how one non-governmental organization project uses culturally relevant assessment and inclusive education to support assessment and education of children in Tanzania, and to offer lessons learned from this study on how assessment and teacher preparation can support inclusive practices and teacher education in Tanzania and other similar locations. This chapter incorporates assessment theory, research in the field, and an understanding of culturally relevant practices drawn from the authors' practical work in the field and Tanzania. This chapter will add to the limited scholarly literature on assessment in inclusive education in Tanzania, while also offering research to practice solutions for teachers and teacher educators in the field.
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Introduction

In this chapter, the authors will describe a case study that illuminates assessment, identification, and inclusive educational practices in Tanzania. For several years, the social model of disability has been the paradigm in the disability studies literature and the medical or rehabilitation models have been the dominant paradigms in educational systems that serve individuals with disabilities in the US and in East African countries (Peters, 1993; Stone-MacDonald & Butera, 2012). On the other hand, the capabilities approach views disability as just one of many factors that contribute to the holistic person and promotes fair treatment in society, so that everyone, with and without a disability, is treated as an equal member of the society. The capabilities approach extends the social model by arguing for the just treatment of individuals with disabilities consistent with a rights model focused on substantive equality and real equality of opportunity (Nussbaum, 2006; Terzi, 2005a, 2005b).

The key objectives of this chapter are: to briefly describe the history of special needs education and policies and assessment practices in Tanzania; to examine how one non-governmental organization project uses culturally relevant assessment and inclusive education to support assessment and education of children in Tanzania; and to offer lessons learned from this study on how assessment and teacher preparation can support inclusive practices and teacher education in Tanzania and other similar locations.

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