Attempting to Bridge Theory to Practice: Preparing for Moving Day with Tele-Observation in Social Studies Methods

Attempting to Bridge Theory to Practice: Preparing for Moving Day with Tele-Observation in Social Studies Methods

Amy J. Good (University of North Carolina at Charlotte, USA) and Drew Polly (University of North Carolina at Charlotte, USA)
Copyright: © 2012 |Pages: 11
DOI: 10.4018/978-1-4666-0014-0.ch028
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Abstract

Preparing teacher candidates to move from the methods course to K-12 classrooms is not an easy task. Educational methods instructors desire to provide a common experience with exemplars of powerful instruction for their teacher candidates. This project builds on previous research related to tele-observation by presenting an observation scheme while capturing a “live case” of social studies instruction prior to the practicum experience with the help of videoconference capabilities. The research questions guiding this study include: (a) In what way (s) could videoconference be part of the process of bridging theory to practice? (b) In what way (s) will teacher candidates pack up the concepts from the methods course and take them to their own practicum experience? Data sources include a three part tele-observation survey and the context of the live case is shared. Teacher candidates report teaching strategies and management strategies they will use in the classroom following the tele-observation experience.
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Background

A review of the literature reveals various projects where methods instructors in various subject areas try to bridge theory to practice with various techniques; including the use of closed circuit television, case studies, digital video, videocases, videotaped lesson samples, and interactive videoconference experiences have been used in practice (Bjerstedt, 1967; Bronack, Kilbane, Herbert, & McNergney, 1999; Harris, 1999; Hoy & Merkley, 1989; Mason, 2001; and Karran, Berson & Mason, 2001) Institutions of higher education have used videoconferencing as a central tool for linking theory to practice and collaboration for undergraduate teachers in social studies methods (Bell & Unger, 2003; Good, O’Connor, & Greene, 2005; Kent, 2007; Vannatta & Reinhart, 1999; Venn, Moore & Gunter, 2001).

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