Balancing the Public Policy Drivers in the Tension between Privacy and Security

Balancing the Public Policy Drivers in the Tension between Privacy and Security

John W. Bagby (The Pennsylvania State University, USA)
Copyright: © 2012 |Pages: 20
DOI: 10.4018/978-1-61350-323-2.ch704
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Abstract

The public expects that technologies used in electronic commerce and government will enhance security while preserving privacy. These expectations are focused through public policy influences, implemented by law, regulation, and standards emanating from states (provincial governments), federal agencies (central governments) and international law. They are influenced through market pressures set in contracts. This chapter posits that personally identifiable information (PII) is a form of property that flows along an “information supply chain” from collection, through archival and analysis and ultimately to its use in decision-making. The conceptual framework for balancing privacy and security developed here provides a foundation to develop and implement public policies that safeguard individual rights, the economy, critical infrastructures and national security. The illusive resolution of the practical antithesis between privacy and security is explored by developing some tradeoff relationships using exemplars from various fields that identify this quandary while recognizing how privacy and security sometimes harmonize.

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