Is Being Perceived as Sustainable a Means to Achieve a Differential Advantage?

Is Being Perceived as Sustainable a Means to Achieve a Differential Advantage?

Avinash Kapoor (Management Development Institute (MDI), India) and Chinmaya Kulshrestha (Management Development Institute (MDI), India)
DOI: 10.4018/978-1-61350-171-9.ch001
OnDemand PDF Download:
$30.00
List Price: $37.50

Abstract

Sustainability has been a concern of activists, organizations, and public officials for several decades. The chapter discusses an important issue: whether consumers purchase sustainable products because they perceive them to be higher in quality or because it makes them feel good. Finally, it submits that the sustained efforts of the organizations can fulfill a brand promise dedicated to enhancing the lives of citizens in the state, nation, and world!
Chapter Preview
Top

Issues

In spite of the interest demonstrated by consumers, managers, and public officials in sustainability, there is a gap in the literature concerning the role of sustainability in marketing and branding strategies and the effects of environmental responsiveness on consumers’ assessments of brands. However, consumers may also doubt the authenticity of sustainable claims made by firms long associated with products not considered environmentally friendly. An important question that remains is whether consumers purchase sustainable products because they perceive them to be higher in quality or because it makes them feel good. The importance of such information is particularly high for organizations as they assess how to best position and promote their organization’s goods and services. Further, it is likely that an emotive effect is also present when a consumer considers an environmentally responsive organization and its effects on quality, satisfaction, and purchase intentions.

Complete Chapter List

Search this Book:
Reset