Big Data Analytics and Internet of Things in Industrial Internet in Former Soviet Union Countries

Big Data Analytics and Internet of Things in Industrial Internet in Former Soviet Union Countries

Vardan Mkrttchian (HHH University, Australia), Leyla Ayvarovna Gamidullaeva (Penza State University, Russia), Svetlana Panasenko (Plekhanov Russian University of Economics, Russia) and Arman Sargsyan (National University of AC of Armenia, Armenia)
Copyright: © 2019 |Pages: 20
DOI: 10.4018/978-1-5225-7432-3.ch020

Abstract

The purpose of this chapter is to explore the integration of three new concepts—big data, internet of things, and internet signs—in the countries of the former Soviet Union. Further, the concept of big data is analyzed. The internet of things is analyzed. Information on semiotics is given, and it reduces to the notion of internet signs. Context concepts and the contribution of big data, internet of things, and internet of signs to contextual simplification are analyzed. The chapter briefly outlines some potential applications of the integration of these three concepts. The chapter briefly discusses the contribution of the study and gives some extensions. These applications included continuous monitoring of accounting data, continuous verification and validation, and use of big data, location information, and other data, for example, to control fraudsters in the countries of the former Soviet Union.
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Introduction

The aim of this research is to show the possibilities of integrating three new concepts of the industrial Internet, namely the Big Data, the Internet of Things (IoT) and Internet Signs in the countries of the Former Soviet Union. The chapter shows that IoT, people and other participants generate “big data” and that “big data” and “Internet of things” can be used to create “Internet signs” in the former Soviet Union of the country. In addition, each of these three interrelated concepts is considered for their impact on the context and available context information. Cox and Ellsworth, (1997) first used the term “large data”, referring to the use of large amounts of data to visualize the scientific data of their experiments. Diebold (2012)) used the term “Big Data in Statistics and Econometrics” back in 2000. Then the term “Big Data” showed a larger set of data, which was more than the norm. At present, this term has expanded, and includes a number of characteristics and the integration of different types of data and analyzes. According to this principle, a number of different sources have developed the term The aim of this research is to show the possibilities of integrating three new concepts of the industrial Internet, namely the Big Data, the Internet of Things (IoT) and Internet Signs in the countries of the Former Soviet Union. The chapter shows that IoT, people and other participants generate “big data” and that “big data” and “Internet of things” can be used to create “Internet signs” in the former Soviet Union of the country. In addition, each of these three interrelated concepts is considered for their impact on the context and available context information. Cox and Ellsworth, (1997) first used the term “large data”, referring to the use of large amounts of data to visualize the scientific data of their experiments. Diebold (2012)) used the term “Big Data in Statistics and Econometrics” back in 2000. Then the term “Big Data” showed a larger set of data, which was more than the norm. At present, this term has expanded, and includes a number of characteristics and the integration of different types of data and analyzes. According to this principle, a number of different sources have developed the term “Big Data.” Therefore, in our study, consider some of these definitions and summarize some of the similarities between them. Further, we will use these definitions to consider the contribution of some applications as “Big Data”. Ashton (2009) showed that the term “Internet of Things” was introduced in 1999, and was originally intended to describe such a situation. Today computers - and, consequently, the Internet - are used by consumers - people for information.

“Big Data.” Therefore, in our study, consider some of these definitions and summarize some of the similarities between them. Further, we will use these definitions to consider the contribution of some applications as “Big Data”. Ashton (2009) showed that the term “Internet of Things” was introduced in 1999, and was originally intended to describe such a situation. Today computers - and, consequently, the Internet - are used by consumers - people for information.

The problem is that people have time, attention and accuracy very different and limited, which means that all their actions are ineffective in collecting data about things in the real world. Therefore, there was an idea to give computers their own means for gathering information so that they could see, hear and deceive the world for themselves. As a result, the “Internet of Things” provides an associated set of computer programs and sensors that, unlike people, work efficiently. Further, more “Internet Things” include data from people connected with the Internet, moving from “Internet of things” to “Internet of everything”, SRA, (2009). Our study examines the expansion of the original concept, which made it possible to use it as a tool for reviewing the context.

The introduced concept of “Online Signs” O'Leary (2012a) is the subject of our study. The term and the concept of “Internet Signs” is due to the fact that in this case, that the data generated on the Internet from a very wide range of sources. These are devices in the “Internet of Things”, it is information from social networks and other Internet sources that are associated with “big data”, “signs” and “moods” on some O'Leary issues (2011). These “signs” generated by information related to the Internet provide “Internet signs”. Introduction of the concept of “Internet Signs” allows you to expand and supplement the potential information about events and situations.

Key Terms in this Chapter

Internet of Signs: Is categories of signs, including written language, natural language, cultural codes, aesthetic codes, codes of tastes, and a number of others.

Internet of Things: Is the interconnection via the Internet of computing devices embedded in everyday objects, enabling them to send and receive data.

Big Data: Is extremely large data sets that may be analyzed computationally to reveal patterns, trends, and associations, especially relating to human behavior and interactions.

Big Context: Is defined as a better understanding of how entities.

Internet of Everything: Is a broad term that refers to devices and consumer products connected to the internet and outfitted with expanded digital features.

Context: Is the circumstances that form the setting for an event, statement, or idea, and in terms of which it can be fully understood.

Internet of People and Things: Is a system of interrelated computing devices, mechanical and digital machines, objects, animals or people that are provided with unique identifiers (UIDs) and the ability to transfer data over a network without requiring human-to-human or human-to-computer interaction.

Semiotics: Is the study of signs and symbols and their use or interpretation.

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