Blended Learning in Nigeria: Determining Students’ Readiness and Faculty Role in Advancing Technology in a Globalized Educational Development

Blended Learning in Nigeria: Determining Students’ Readiness and Faculty Role in Advancing Technology in a Globalized Educational Development

Nwachukwu Prince Ololube (University of Education, Port Harcourt, Nigeria)
Copyright: © 2011 |Pages: 18
DOI: 10.4018/978-1-60960-479-0.ch011

Abstract

Blended learning requirements are increasing, in part because of the population explosion and policies pertaining to the democratization of education. Yet, thousands of students and faculty remain deficient in the use of blended learning to advance technology in developing countries, especially sub-Saharan Africa. This research employed a quantitative assessment design aimed at improving best available practices, processes, and performance in terms of the blended learning offered in a university setting. A six-point Likert-type questionnaire was used to gather data. Multiple statistical procedures were employed in the subsequent analysis—percentage, mean point values, chi-square, and ANOVA. Majority of the respondents to the questionnaire agreed that the teaching of MIS to students is effective and has a positive impact on their academic achievements. This groundbreaking research presents a realistic resource for the practical application of blended learning in university education in Nigeria, as well as a comprehensive view of the benefits and problems of the applicability of blended learning.
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Research Objectives

This text records the findings of a research study that reviewed and codified what was already known about blended learning and student academic achievement. While we recognize the insensitive academic environment in Nigeria that researchers (Ifinedo & Ololube, 2007) have posited as being responsible for slow growth rates in Nigerian education system, however, blended learning is gradually taking shape in university education in Nigeria especially in the private universities.

Internet searches confirm that very little has been written about this domain of study in Nigeria. The enthusiasm to write this chapter arises from the desire to examine students readiness and faculty role in the use of blended learning methodologies (technology-based materials and face-to-face sessions) to present educational content. It also arises from a desire to assess students’ readiness and faculty role in employing blended learning as a way of attaining teaching and learning effectiveness and, finally, a desire to determine success so far in terms of student academic achievements.

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