Calcium Phosphate Coating on Titanium by RF Magnetron Sputtering

Calcium Phosphate Coating on Titanium by RF Magnetron Sputtering

Takayuki Narushima (Tohoku University, Japan) and Kyosuke Ueda (Tohoku University, Japan)
DOI: 10.4018/978-1-4666-2196-1.ch024
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Abstract

In this chapter, the authors discuss the fabrication and properties of calcium phosphate coatings on titanium (Ti) by radio-frequency (RF) magnetron sputtering. First, they address the necessity of surface modification of metallic biomaterials and the effectiveness of calcium phosphate coating. Next, they briefly review the processes used in the application of calcium phosphate coatings and present the effect of sputtering parameters on the phase and deposition rates of these coatings. Finally, the chapter discusses the performance of amorphous and crystalline (oxyapatite) calcium phosphate coatings on Ti based on in vitro and in vivo evaluations.
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Surface Modification Using Calcium Phosphate Coating

Figure 1 shows the surface modification processes used for improving the bone compatibility of metallic biomaterials (Goto et al., 2011). The morphology and phase/composition of their surface layers are modified using a dry process, a wet process, or both processes. The aim of modifying the surface morphology is to increase the adhesion strength between bones and implants by means of an anchorage effect (Hanawa, 2003). The purpose of phase/composition modification is to form an apatite (calcium phosphate) coating or a non-apatite coating that enhances the formation of apatite.

Figure 1.

Surface modification processes for improving the bone compatibility of metallic biomaterials

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