CBM Elements I

CBM Elements I

Patricia A. Young (University of Maryland at Baltimore, USA)
Copyright: © 2009 |Pages: 26
DOI: 10.4018/978-1-60566-426-2.ch007
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Abstract

Elements (E1-E25) facilitate content development. These Elements are intended to be comprehensive in providing the fundamental total of which all culture is composed. Most of those things that formulate a culture are included in the 25 Elements. The tangibles and intangibles define the Elements. Tangibles have material qualities and intangibles nonmaterial qualities (see Table 7.1). The meanings of the terms culture and society can overlap, but they should be viewed separately within the space of design. A society is a group of people who share commonalities that are understood by all and collectively inhabit a particular physical area (Germain & Bloom, 1999; Segall, Dasen, Berry, & Poortinga, 1999). Every society has a culture or ways of being, doing and thinking. This culture shapes societies behavior (Ember & Ember, 1996; Hofstede & Hofstede, 2005). In understanding a culture, there must also be an understanding of its past and present histories and the histories of its people (Kim & Park, 2006). The Elements are divided into three sections: the anthropology of culture, the psychology of culture, and the science of culture. These divisions are consistent with research in the disciplines of cultural anthropology, cultural psychology, and science; however, there are modifications to provide application of these concepts as design constructs. An overview of each section is provided as context for the Elements. Then each design factor is defined, described, and illustrated through relevant cross-cultural examples. A set of guiding questions for the design process are offered that are specific to the culture and the target audience.
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Cbm Elements

Elements (E1-E25) facilitate content development. These Elements are intended to be comprehensive in providing the fundamental total of which all culture is composed. Most of those things that formulate a culture are included in the 25 Elements. The tangibles and intangibles define the Elements. Tangibles have material qualities and intangibles nonmaterial qualities (see Table 1).

Table 1.
CBM elements
ElementsTangibles and Intangibles
The anthropology of culture:
E1. Cultural aestheticsThat which is considered beautiful
E2. Cultural artifactsProducts that exist or remain
E3. Cultural capitalEconomics and material wealth
E4. Cultural classificationDivisions in a culture or society
E5. Cultural communicationsThe exchange or transmission of information
E6. Cultural demographicsCharacteristics of a population
E7. Cultural environmentPhysical and social conditions in which a human being, other species or entity lives and develops
E8. Cultural historyNarrative representation of historical events
E9. Cultural knowledgeWhat is known and what one comes to know
E10. Cultural languageLanguage form, content, use and meaning
E11. Cultural physiologyThe physiological characteristics of a human being, other species or entity
E12. Cultural relationsThe relationship of one being to another being
E13. Cultural resourcesThe use and cultivation of resources
The psychology of culture:
E14. Cultural beliefs & valuesBeliefs (shared truths); values (shared ideas)
E15. Cultural experiencesThe interpretation of the world from inside and out
E16. Cultural ideasThe use and meaning of ideas and perceptions
E17. Cultural identityDistinguishing qualities of a human being, other species or entity
E18. Cultural interestsDeeply personal desires, wants, wishes
E19. Cultural misconceptionsUntruths, myths, stereotypes
E20. Cultural waysBehaviors, norms, feelings
The science of culture:
E21. Cultural anomaliesHappenings that promote, initiate, or force cultural change
E22. Cultural culturesThe scientific identification of cultures, worlds, ecosystems
E23. Cultural futuresThat which is to come
E24. Cultural infinitiesThose things without limits: time, space, distance
E25. Cultural natureIntrinsic characteristics of a human being, other species or entity

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