CBM Elements V

CBM Elements V

Patricia A. Young (University of Maryland at Baltimore, USA)
Copyright: © 2009 |Pages: 17
DOI: 10.4018/978-1-60566-426-2.ch011
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Abstract

This chapter continues with CBM Elements and the design factors related to the anthropology of culture. Cultural knowledge, Cultural language, Cultural physiology, Cultural relations and Cultural resources are covered. Cultural knowledge examines what is known and what one comes to know (Thomas, 2001). It is the acquisition, learning, translation, transfer, teaching, recording, documentation, preservation, creation, accessibility, use, and application of knowledge “Most of what anyone knows is cultural knowledge (D’Andrade, 1995, p. xiv).” Over the course of a human’s life, they learn a wealth of knowledge. Humans store and pass on this knowledge from generation to generation. This cultural knowledge is contained in words, narratives, artifacts, and human experiences (Dougherty, 1985).
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Cultural Knowledge

  • E9. Cultural Knowledge - What is known and what one comes to know.

Cultural knowledge examines what is known and what one comes to know (Thomas, 2001). It is the acquisition, learning, translation, transfer, teaching, recording, documentation, preservation, creation, accessibility, use, and application of knowledge “Most of what anyone knows is cultural knowledge (D’Andrade, 1995, p. xiv).” Over the course of a human’s life, they learn a wealth of knowledge. Humans store and pass on this knowledge from generation to generation. This cultural knowledge is contained in words, narratives, artifacts, and human experiences (Dougherty, 1985).1

Knowledge can be thought of as that which is known or acquired. Known knowledge can be innately a part of an individual. For example, Confucius’s followers believed that certain exceptional individuals possessed “intrinsic knowledge” and that they were born with this knowledge (Thomas, 2001, p. 54). Acquired knowledge is learned through a variety of sources; however, it varies from culture to culture. Some common examples of acquired knowledge are lived experience, modeling others, and instruction (e.g., schooling, apprenticeship). In some cultures, dreams are believed to be a source of knowledge because dreams can reveal the future and guide life choices. Visions are considered a way of acquiring knowledge. For example, many Great Plains Indian tribes practice the ritual of vision quest. In this ritual, information is sought to determine an individual’s sacred name, guiding spirit, and other knowledge (Thomas, 2001).

Culture GQ

What is the history of knowledge in this society or culture? How does a human being acquire knowledge? How is knowledge learned by human beings? How is knowledge translated to the human being? How is knowledge transferred from one human being to another human being? How is knowledge taught to the human being? Through what means is knowledge recorded? Through what means is knowledge documented? Through what means is knowledge preserved? Through what means is knowledge created? How is knowledge made accessible? How is knowledge preserved by the human being? How is knowledge learned by human beings? Who within the society or culture creates this knowledge? How is this knowledge validated? Who has access to this knowledge? How is this knowledge used and applied? What is the logic or reasoning behind this knowledge? When does knowledge become information? How do individuals know what they know? What forms of technology have been used to acquire, learn, translate, transfer, teach, record, document, preserve, create, access, use, and apply knowledge? How is knowledge used as power in this society or culture?

Target Audience GQ

What is the history of knowledge as it pertains to the target audience? How is knowledge acquired by the target audience? How is knowledge learned by the target audience? How is knowledge translated to the target audience? How is knowledge transferred from one target audience member to another? How is knowledge taught to the target audience? Through what means is knowledge recorded by the target audience? Through what means is knowledge documented by the target audience? Through what means is knowledge preserved for the target audience? Through what means is knowledge created by the target audience? How is knowledge made accessible to the target audience? How is knowledge preserved by the target audience? How is knowledge learned by the target audience? Who within the target audience creates this knowledge? How is this knowledge validated by the target audience? Who has access to the knowledge generated by the target audience? How is knowledge used and applied by the target audience? What is the logic or reasoning behind this knowledge? How does the target audience know what they know? For the target audience, what forms of technology have been used to acquire, learn, translate, transfer, teach, record, document, preserve, create, access, use and apply knowledge? How has the target audience participated as producers of theories, recipients of theories, or participants in the formulation of knowledge? Is knowledge used to empower or control the target audience, and if so, in what way? How does the target audience feel about their ability to access, create, or acquire knowledge?

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