Cell Phone Conversation while Driving

Cell Phone Conversation while Driving

Abu Sadat Nurullah (University of Alberta, Canada)
Copyright: © 2015 |Pages: 12
DOI: 10.4018/978-1-4666-8239-9.ch103
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Abstract

This article presents a review of studies on the conversational aspect of cell-phone use while operating a motor vehicle. Research has indicated that talking on a cell phone while driving poses a safety threat to people both in the vehicle and on the road. This is because cell phone conversations take considerable cognitive, visual, and physical demands on the person involved in this task. However, research has also shown that people engage in risky driving behavior, even after being cognizant of the dangers associated with it. Therefore, policies need to be implemented to thwart the use of cell phones while operating a motor vehicle, to educate people about the risks that this behavior poses, and in so doing, to make the road safer for drivers and pedestrians.
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Introduction

This article presents an in-depth review of studies on the conversational aspect of cell-phone use while operating a motor vehicle. Here, a cell phone refers to any mobile device used to answer and initiate calls as well to send and receive texts, which includes smartphones (e.g., iPhone, Blackberry). Conversation denotes any length of talking on a cell phone. Driving indicates operating any type of motor vehicle on the road, including stopping at a red light.

Engaging in a cell phone conversation while operating a vehicle has become a public safety concern and a social problem. Research has indicated that talking on a cell phone while operating a vehicle produces a four-fold increase in the risk of involvement in a collision compared to when not talking on a cell phone (McEvoy et al., 2005). Studies report that the risks of using hands-free cell phones can be as great as using hand-held ones, because regardless of the phone type cell-phone use while driving decreases people’s driving performance and increases the likelihood of involvement in an accident (Amado & Ulupinar, 2005; Caird, Willness, Steel, & Scialfa, 2008; Collet, Guillot, & Petit, 2010a, 2010b; Dragutinovic & Twisk 2005; Hendrick & Switzer, 2007; Ishigami & Klein, 2009; McEvoy et al., 2005; Törnros & Bolling, 2005; Zhao et al., 2013). This means that using either a hands-free or a hand-held cell phone can cause drivers failing to notice pedestrians or other vehicles in their vicinity, or missing traffic signals and lanes, resulting in traffic collisions (Nurullah, Thomas, & Vakilian, 2013).

Key Terms in this Chapter

Driving: Operating any type of motor vehicle on the road, including stopping at a red light.

Conversation: Any length of talking on a cell phone.

Hand-Held: The use and controlling of a mobile device by hand.

Cell-Phone Use: The use of any mobile device (including smartphones, e.g., iPhone, Blackberry) to answer and initiate calls as well as to send and receive texts.

Safety: Protection from collisions and injuries.

Hands-Free: The use and controlling of a mobile device without holding it by hand; typically done using voice commands through Bluetooth or wireless technology.

Injury: Physical harm caused by a collision; can be minor or severe.

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