Challenges in the Design and Development of a “Third Generation” E-Learning/Educational Platform

Challenges in the Design and Development of a “Third Generation” E-Learning/Educational Platform

Marius Marusteri (Department of Medical Informatics and Biostatistics, University of Medicine and Pharmacy Targu Mures, Romania), Marius Petrisor (Department of Medical Informatics and Biostatistics, University of Medicine and Pharmacy Targu Mures, Romania), Peter Olah (Department of Medical Informatics and Biostatistics, University of Medicine and Pharmacy Targu Mures, Romania), Bogdan Haifa (Department of Medical Informatics and Biostatistics, University of Medicine and Pharmacy Targu Mures, Romania), Vladimir Bacarea (Department of Research Methodology, University of Medicine and Pharmacy Targu Mures, Romania) and Klara Brinzaniuc (Department of Anatomy, University of Medicine and Pharmacy Targu Mures, Romania)
Copyright: © 2015 |Pages: 11
DOI: 10.4018/978-1-4666-5888-2.ch130
OnDemand PDF Download:
$30.00
List Price: $37.50

Chapter Preview

Top

Background

On today scientific literature, there are many definitions of the “e-learning/” term, depending of the author’s viewpoint: e.g. Technology-driven definitions, Delivery-System-Oriented definitions, Communication-Oriented definitions, Educational-Paradigm-Oriented definitions etc (Sangra, 2012).

From the same perspective, there are also many (more or less partial) synonyms for the “e-learning” term – creating even more confusion related to the above mentioned definitions - such as: multimedia learning, virtual learning /virtual education, online education, Technology-Enhanced Learning (TEL), Computer-Based instruction (CBI), Computer Assisted Instruction/Computer Aided Instruction (CAI), Computer-Based Training (CBT), Internet-Based Training (IBT), Web-Based Training (WBT), m-learning/Mobile Learning etc (Kaplan-Leiserson, 2000).

But, based on our experience as users/developers of e-learning solutions (Marusteri, 2005, 2006a, 2006b), on the progress of the ICT domain and on the recent scientific literature (Goodyear, 2010; Spooner, 2011; Wang, 2012), we consider that some of these “synonyms” may be seen now much more as some particular branches of the e-learning domain, rather than proper or even partial synonyms of the “e-learning” term.

Key Terms in this Chapter

E-Learning: The use of electronic media and ICT in education.

Synchronous E-Learning: The teacher will lead the students activities using computers/over a network.

Collaborative E-Learning/Educational Platform: Integrated e-learning solutions, where teachers and students may collaborate, generate and share knowledge together.

Educational Content Generators: Intuitive software that may unleash the creative potential of both teacher and students, allowing them to easily create and share new educational content.

E-Learning/Educational Platform: An integrated E-learning Environment for both asynchronous and synchronous e-learning tasks.

Asynchronous E-Learning: The student may use the e-learning resources provided by the teacher/instructor for self-paced/flexible learning activities.

Complete Chapter List

Search this Book:
Reset