Code Ownership

Code Ownership

Barbara Russo (Free University of Bozen-Balzano, Italy), Marco Scotto (Free University of Bozen-Balzano, Italy), Alberto Sillitti (Free University of Bozen-Balzano, Italy) and Giancarlo Succi (Free University of Bozen-Balzano, Italy)
Copyright: © 2010 |Pages: 9
DOI: 10.4018/978-1-59904-681-5.ch008
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Abstract

In many AMs, such as XP, the source code does not belong to the developer that wrote it. The common practice is that all the code belongs to the whole team; therefore every member can modify it. Collective Code Ownership encourages everyone to contribute new ideas to all parts of the project. Any developer can change any line of code to add functionality, fix bugs, or refactor. No one person becomes a bottle neck for changes. This could seem hard to understand at first. It is almost inconceivable that an entire team can be responsible for the architecture of the system (Beck, 1999; Feller & Fitzgerald, 2001).
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8.2 Pareto Analysis

Pareto analysis is a statistical technique in decision making that is used for selection of a limited number of tasks that produce significant overall effect. It uses the Pareto principle, the name derives from the Italian economist Vilfredo Pareto, who observed that 80% of income in Italy went to 20% of the population. Pareto later carried out surveys on a number of other countries and found to his surprise that a similar distribution applied.

Pareto analysis is a formal technique useful where many possible courses of action are competing for your attention. In essence, the problem-solver estimates the benefit delivered by each action, then selects a number of the most effective actions that deliver a total benefit reasonably close to the maximal possible one.

8.2.1 Example

Step 1: Frequency Analysis

The first step of the Pareto analysis is to gather data on the frequency of causes (Table 1).

Table 1.
Pareto analysis
Possible cause%
A1
B1
C2
D2
E13
C2
D2
E2
F6
G2
H1
I1
J16
K1
L2
M1
N14
O12
Q9
R10
Total100

Step 2. Ranking Causes

To identify the most important causes, we rank the causes based on the frequencies they found in their survey (Table 2).

Table 2.
Ranking
Possible cause%Cumulative %
J1616
N1430
E1343
O1255
R1065
Q974
F680
C282
D284
C286
D288
E290
G292
L294
A195
B196
H197
I198
K199
M1100

Step 3: Pareto Graph

We draw a horizontal axis (x) that represents the different causes, ordered from the most to least frequent. Next, we draw a vertical axis (y) with cumulative percentages from 0 to 100% (Figure 1).

Figure 1.

Pareto chart

Now it is easy to see that approximately 7 factors are responsible for 80% of problem. The other 13 factors are responsible for only 20%.

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