Collaboration Not Competition: International Education Expanding Perspectives on Learning and Workforce Articulation

Collaboration Not Competition: International Education Expanding Perspectives on Learning and Workforce Articulation

Cynthia J. Benton (State University of New York College at Cortland, USA), Orvil L. White (State University of New York College at Cortland, USA) and Susan K. Stratton (State University of New York College at Cortland, USA)
Copyright: © 2015 |Pages: 18
DOI: 10.4018/978-1-4666-7363-2.ch040
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Abstract

This chapter documents the development of a program for college faculty, public school teachers, graduate, and undergraduate students to pursue international travel, study, and teaching in Thailand. The program features collaboration among institutions, faculty colleagues, and school personnel focused particularly on science and mathematics education. The chapter reflects on the current methodological perspectives used to compare educational systems and the concomitant outcomes in workforce articulation. Details of expansion, development, and measurement of local, individual, and program success are provided and analyzed using current competitive international models. An alternative view of international relationships as collaborative learning opportunities is proposed.
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Collaboration Not Competition: International Education Expanding Perspectives On Learning And Workforce Articulation

Findings from a wide range of studies have established the influence of rapidly expanding communication and technological resources which have resulted in increased contact among systems and organizations on an international scale (OECD, 2012; Friedman, 2006), and for the purposes of this chapter, in the systems practices of higher education (Egron-Polak, 2012; Sawchuk, 2012). In the context of increasing systems interdependence, global expansion in the past half-century has created frequent comparisons of student school achievement in both post-industrial and currently developing nations (Schleicher, in Hargreaves, Lieberman, Fullan, & Hopkins, 2010). National and international comparisons have seldom focused on the possible contributions of a collaborative rather than a competitive model for promoting workforce preparation. This chapter argues for the positive learning contributions of a mutually beneficial international study program which takes a broad approach to participation and purpose, involving multiple international institutions, college faculty, K-12 school personnel, college students and K-12 students.

The thrust of the report focuses on programmatic issues which indicate effective educational experiences, but which also infer a revision in the ways success--both programmatic and educational--might be assessed on a global scale. Taking a collaborative stance, the authors establish the benefits for all stakeholders in the program, and provide indicators which project improvements in both intellectual and workforce outcomes.

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