College Student Reception of Next-Generation Learning and Effective Approaches for Instructors

College Student Reception of Next-Generation Learning and Effective Approaches for Instructors

Donna M. Farina (New Jersey City University, USA) and Natalia Coleman (New Jersey City University, USA)
DOI: 10.4018/978-1-5225-3873-8.ch017
OnDemand PDF Download:
$30.00
List Price: $37.50

Abstract

Next-generation learning (NxGL) approaches have been applied to improve learning outcomes for the diverse student population of New Jersey City University (NJCU), one of the top hundred most diverse institutions of higher education in the country. This chapter focuses on the variety of reactions that diverse students, both undergraduate and graduate, can have to unknown or unfamiliar learning experiences, as they move through different stages of adjustment to the next-generation classroom. The chapter discusses how instructors can anticipate common student reactions and what they can do to guide students toward successful participation in NxGL. The improved skills of the instructor will allow students to benefit to the fullest possible extent from new learning opportunities. If the instructor feels at home with next-generation teaching and learning, this will increase the potential for student success as well as satisfaction with these approaches.
Chapter Preview
Top

Introduction

The authors of this chapter have applied next-generation learning (NxGL) approaches to enhance learning outcomes for the highly diverse student population of New Jersey City University (NJCU). NJCU ranks in the top hundred most diverse institutions of higher education in the country. Its undergraduate population is 38% Hispanic, 22% Black, 22% White, and 8% Asian (NJCU fact sheet, 2017), and many of its students do not speak English as their first language. While the value of next-generation learning to assist non-traditional student populations has been discussed in the literature, the current chapter focuses on something that is addressed less frequently: the potential pitfalls of using newer modes of learning. A common assumption is that it is college instructors who move reluctantly toward learner-centered and project-based approaches to instructional delivery, whereas modern students eagerly await digital, cooperative, and other new learning experiences. In reality, the more diverse the student population, the more likely it is that there will be a wide variety of reactions—including resistance—to unknown or unfamiliar learning experiences.

This chapter dissects how students move through different stages of adjustment to the next-generation classroom culture. After defining what next-generation learning is, we describe stages of “acculturation” or adjustment to new learning. Next we identify some common reactions or behaviors of students at each stage, as they cope with unfamiliar ways of learning. Since motivation plays a key role in how expeditiously students move through the process of adjustment to new learning approaches, it will figure throughout the discussion. The chapter will consider how instructors can anticipate common student reactions (both positive and negative).

Finally, we suggest what instructors can do to guide students toward more successful learning outcomes—how instructors can plan and revise their curriculum, and manage their in-person classroom to facilitate all students' ability to experience “self-efficacy” (Judge, Erez, & Bono, 1998). The fact that an instructor uses or tries to utilize NxGL techniques guarantees nothing in terms of results; instructors need to understand how to support student adjustment and the overall student experience. The improved skills of the instructor will allow students to benefit to the fullest possible extent from new learning opportunities. The ultimate goal is for instructors to feel truly at home with next-generation teaching and learning, because their comfort level is essential for student success as well as satisfaction.

Key Terms in this Chapter

Next-Generation Learning: “Activity-based approaches to teaching and learning, allowing students to become creators of knowledge rather than mere recipients of knowledge” ( Mintz, 2016 ).

Stem Education: Science, technology, engineering, and math education. These four areas incorporate a multitude of disciplines that are deeply interconnected and considered essential for student success in the 21st century.

Google Doc: An application in the cloud, from the company Google, that allows the user to create documents similar to those in Microsoft Word. Multiple users can revise such documents simultaneously, allowing enhanced collaboration.

Self-Efficacy: “An individual’s perception of their ability to perform across a variety of situations;” “a strong belief in one’s own capabilities” ( Judge, Erez, & Bono, 1998 , p. 170).

Project-Based Learning: “A dynamic classroom approach in which students actively explore real-world problems and challenges and acquire a deeper knowledge” (Edutopia, 2016 AU26: The in-text citation "Edutopia, 2016" is not in the reference list. Please correct the citation, add the reference to the list, or delete the citation. ).

Active Learning: “A process whereby students engage in activities, such as reading, writing, discussion, or problem solving that promote analysis, synthesis, and evaluation of class content” (CRLT, n.d. AU25: The in-text citation "CRLT, n.d." is not in the reference list. Please correct the citation, add the reference to the list, or delete the citation. ).

Complete Chapter List

Search this Book:
Reset