Computer Mediated Communication and Multimodal Instruction in Higher Education

Computer Mediated Communication and Multimodal Instruction in Higher Education

J. Patrick Williams (College of Staten Island, City University of New York, USA) and Hsin-Liang Chen (University of Missouri at Columbia, USA)
Copyright: © 2008 |Pages: 18
DOI: 10.4018/978-1-59904-863-5.ch011
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Abstract

This chapter examines the impact of multimodal, computer-mediated communication strategies on instruction in higher education. Colleges and universities have realized positive effects of using computer- mediated communication in instruction, but these effects are often accompanied by unintended, unexpected, and surprising changes to instructional practices, course dynamics, and student outcomes. With the introduction of computer-mediated communication in the instructional setting, the array of roles and expectations increases substantially. This chapter outlines the use of ICTs in “blended” and fully-online learning spaces and highlights some of our observations gained in teaching and performing research in an online course. Researchers should focus on investigating the roles, expectations, and interactions that accompany these changes and work to support the evolving needs of all constituents of technology-enhanced learning spaces. We believe it is important that, as researchers, we investigate ways in which accessibility, flexibility, and seamless integration of ICTs, user experience, and pedagogy can be maximized.

Key Terms in this Chapter

Multimodal Learning Objects: Instructional tools comprised of two or more simultaneous media—text, images, audio, video, synchronous chat, drawing tools, etc.

Social Bookmarking: The practice of making “bookmarks” of Web sites and online resources available to the public or to peer groups for further distribution, categorization, and resource discovery.

Course Management System (CMS): A software application or suite of software applications that facilitate communication and course work online. Popular CMS tools include Blackboard, WebCT, and Sakai. Course management systems differ from traditional content management systems due to their focused support for instructional needs such as assessment and class roster management.

Blended Learning: An instructional approach that augments the traditional face-to-face instructional environment with asynchronous technologies for communication and learning.

Social Bookmarking: The practice of making “bookmarks” of Web sites and online resources available to the public or to peer groups for further distribution, categorization, and resource discovery.

Asynchronous Communication: Communication in which the participants are not co-present in time, e-mail, discussion boards, and Weblogs are examples of this type of communication.

Synchronous Communication: Real-time, back-and-forth communication as afforded by face-to-face meetings, teleconferencing, videoconferencing, instant messaging, and chat rooms.

Webcasting: Providing a live audio and video stream to remote users; in this chapter, distributing A/V lectures and discussions to students.

Multimodal Learning Objects: Instructional tools comprised of two or more simultaneous media—text, images, audio, video, synchronous chat, drawing tools, etc.

Blended Learning: An instructional approach that augments the traditional face-to-face instructional environment with asynchronous technologies for communication and learning.

Webcasting: Providing a live audio and video stream to remote users; in this chapter, distributing A/V lectures and discussions to students.

Course Management System (CMS): A software application or suite of software applications that facilitate communication and course work online. Popular CMS tools include Blackboard, WebCT, and Sakai. Course management systems differ from traditional content management systems due to their focused support for instructional needs such as assessment and class roster management.

Asynchronous Communication: Communication in which the participants are not co-present in time, e-mail, discussion boards, and Weblogs are examples of this type of communication.

Synchronous Communication: Real-time, back-and-forth communication as afforded by face-to-face meetings, teleconferencing, videoconferencing, instant messaging, and chat rooms.

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