Connectivity and Topology Organization in Ad-Hoc Networks for Service Delivery

Connectivity and Topology Organization in Ad-Hoc Networks for Service Delivery

Cesar Vargas-Rosales (Instituto Tecnológico y de Estudios Superiores de Monterrey, Mexico), Sergio Barrientos (Instituto Tecnológico y de Estudios Superiores de Monterrey, Mexico), David Munoz (Instituto Tecnológico y de Estudios Superiores de Monterrey, Mexico) and Jose R. Rodriguez (Instituto Tecnológico y de Estudios Superiores de Monterrey, Mexico)
DOI: 10.4018/978-1-60960-027-3.ch011
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Abstract

This chapter introduces the concept of connectivity and robustness of a mobile ad-hoc network as a function of the node density and coverage radius. It presents an elementary analytical model based on the spatial Poisson process to formulate the connectivity problem as the computation of the existence of wireless links forming paths obtained by Dijkstra’s shortest path algorithm. It also introduces a simple clustering strategy that starts forming groups based on one-hop distance and then adjust the coverage radius of the nodes in order to decrease the interference, processing load and isolated nodes in the network. It includes results of scenarios with different robustness of origin-destination pairs and number of clusters and shows the benefits of using the introduced policies.
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Background

A mobile ad-hoc network, (Macker & Corson, 1998; Chakrabarti & Mishra, 2001), is defined as an autonomous system of mobile nodes connected by wireless links, where these nodes are free to move randomly and organize themselves arbitrarily, changing the wireless network topology quickly and unpredictably. It is a self-configuring network of mobile devices connected throughout wireless links. Nodes establish communication in a point to point fashion, without the need of a central unit to enable communication between nodes. Such a network may operate in a standalone fashion, or may be connected to Access Points (APs), which are larger processing units that provide communication with the rest of the public switched network.

Wireless ad-hoc networks became a popular subject for research as laptops and 802.11/Wi-Fi wireless networking became widespread in the mid to late 1990s. Many of the academic papers evaluate protocols and abilities assuming varying degrees of mobility within a bounded space, usually with all nodes within a few hops of each other, and usually with nodes sending data at a constant rate. Performance of different protocols is based on the packet drop rate, the overhead introduced by the routing protocol, and other measures.

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