Considerations of Self in Recognising Prior Learning and Credentialing

Considerations of Self in Recognising Prior Learning and Credentialing

Lloyd Hawkeye Robertson (Athabasca University, Canada) and Dianne Conrad (Athabasca University, Canada)
DOI: 10.4018/978-1-4666-8856-8.ch010
OnDemand PDF Download:
$30.00
List Price: $37.50

Abstract

Discussions about recognition of prior learning (RPL) and credentialing frequently focus on issues of equivalency and rigour, rather than the effects of assessment on self-structure. Yet, such processes invite reflexive self-assessment that results in either a conformational or destabilising effect on self-identity. Those interested in RPL therefore need to understand how the process impacts on self and how learner needs associated with those impacts may be met. This chapter explores the self as a sub-text within the RPL process and argues that learners should be viewed as holistic and complex beings and that educational strategies can meet multiple objectives that extend beyond the educational domain, potentially creating an overlap with learners' mental health. The authors encourage policies and practices that validate the individual and enhance the possibility of developmental self-growth. A learner-centred ethic that meets the dual needs of learners to obtain credit and achieve self-development is proposed.
Chapter Preview
Top

The History And Importance Of The Study Of Self As Regards Learning

The literature of higher education and adult learning has long recognised the value of providing adults with not only cognitive and workplace skills but also with tools for development in the affective - social and emotional - domains of learning. The giants of lifelong and adult learning literature have described extensively the relationships between adults and their learning: It is learner-driven, powered by internal motivators, and self-directed (Brookfield, 1990; Candy, 1991; Knowles, 1970). Adults learn what they need to learn when they need to learn it (Knowles, 1970; Tough, 1971).

Complete Chapter List

Search this Book:
Reset