Coursework in Scholarly Habits of Research Methodology and Dissemination

Coursework in Scholarly Habits of Research Methodology and Dissemination

DOI: 10.4018/978-1-7998-2656-9.ch005

Abstract

This chapter parallels the previous chapter in format but uses the same three programs to examine the coursework specific to research methodology and dissemination. This includes methodology for both quantitative and qualitative research, with each program having their own balance between quantitative or qualitative emphasis. Dissemination includes the format for writing research reports, making scholarly presentations, and the development of manuscripts for publication.
Chapter Preview
Top

Research Methodology And Design

Research methodology is generally considered to come in two basic forms: qualitative and quantitative. While research methodology courses are a common requirement across doctoral programs, the specific coursework varies greatly.

In examining the three programs explored above, you will find examples of this diversity:

The University of Missouri requires four courses (12 hours) in methodology before the dissertation:

  • Quantitative Analysis in Educational Research

  • Qualitative Methods of Educational Research I

  • Qualitative Methods of Educational Research II

  • Elective Course in Quantitative Methods

The University of Wisconsin requires five courses (15 hours) in methodology before the dissertation:

  • Statistical Methods Applied to Education I

  • Statistical Methods Applied to Education II

  • Introduction to Qualitative Research

  • Elective Course in Research Design and Statistics

  • Elective Course in Research Design and Statistics

Carson-Newman University has a specific set of three courses (9 hours) in the research sequence before the dissertation:

  • Quantitative and Qualitative Research Design

  • Critical Analysis and Research Design

  • Professional Composition Studies

The common aspects are clearly attention to both quantitative and qualitative research methodology and research design. From a glance at the requirements, Missouri seems to be favoring attention to qualitative research while allowing room for up to two quantitative courses if the candidate and committee choose that route. Wisconsin, on the other hand, appears to place an emphasis quantitative research while allowing for the development of expertise in qualitative methodology if the candidates and committee choose that route. Carson-Newman University takes yet a third path which allows for equal attention to both qualitative and quantitative methods and design in all three courses.

The number of courses and credit hours needed, however, varies from three courses to five courses. All have three specific required research courses. The variance is in the number of elective research courses.

Top

Dissemination Of Knowledge

Beyond the technical aspects of methodology and design, the third aspect of scholarly work is dissemination. Dissemination of new knowledge from research and reflection is most often done in the form of writing a dissertation, writing for publication, or making presentations at professional conferences. Writing for publication and presenting work at professional conferences are usually accomplishments that are required to earn tenure and move up in rank within universities. It is often not required for other jobs in which graduates of educational doctoral programs find themselves employed. Hence, there is some question as to whether it should be a central focus and/or required part of the curriculum of a doctoral program. From a communities of practice perspective, however, the dissemination of knowledge is a critical practice that informs the communities focused on research, the communities focused on practice, and those that aim for a balance between research and practice.

I have made the choice to include it here as a part of doctoral education for two reasons:

Complete Chapter List

Search this Book:
Reset