Development and Evaluation of Neuroscience Computer-Based Modules for Medical Students: Instructional Design Principles and Effectiveness

Development and Evaluation of Neuroscience Computer-Based Modules for Medical Students: Instructional Design Principles and Effectiveness

Kathryn L. Lovell (Michigan State University, USA)
Copyright: © 2017 |Pages: 15
DOI: 10.4018/978-1-5225-2098-6.ch013
OnDemand PDF Download:
$30.00
List Price: $37.50

Abstract

Interactive neuropathology computer-based teaching modules and other neuroscience computer-based resources were developed to provide individualized self-paced content information accompanied by images and self-assessment questions with feedback, along with problem-solving cases to facilitate application of neuroanatomy, neurology, and neuropathology concepts to patient cases. Initial implementation occurred in three curricula for second-year medical students. Evaluation of the modules was conducted using quantitative and qualitative methods to determine features of the modules that were important for students. This chapter will describe the instructional design principles that evaluation results identified as important and effective for student learning, and compare those to current principles for effective multimedia instructional design identified in a variety of research. Especially important principles applied in the neuroscience modules included cognitive load theory, retrieval practice and self-assessment, feedback, and learner control.
Chapter Preview
Top

Introduction

Interactive computer-based teaching modules covering neuropathology content for second-year medical students were first developed by the author when interactive computer programs (e.g. Hypercard) and videodiscs with randomly accessible images became available (images from the second edition of Slice of Life videodisc, coordinated by Suzanne Stensaas, Ph.D., were utilized; most of the neuropathology images were provided by Margaret Z. Jones, M.D.). These factors were ideal for pathology content where gross and microscopic images are essential to the learning process. The goal of the modules was to provide individualized self-paced content information accompanied by images and self-testing questions with feedback, along with problem-solving cases to facilitate application of neuroanatomy, neurology, and neuropathology concepts to patient cases.

The development process included consideration of instructional design principles, production of initial topics (neoplastic disorders and cerebrovascular disorders), use-testing to determine student perceptions of technical and instructional effectiveness, and revisions based on student input. All images and diagrams were open source (Creative Commons or similar licensing). The interactive modules have been used continuously in the Colleges of Human Medicine and Osteopathic Medicine at Michigan State University since 1988, and repeated evaluations have demonstrated student support for the effectiveness of the instructional design principles. Periodic changes have been made based on changes in software and hardware, and access to additional images, and additional neuroscience units have been created for specific teaching goals.

The objectives of this chapter are to describe the development and structure of the neuropathology teaching modules and other units, including the instructional design principles utilized; to summarize results of evaluation of the modules by students; and to compare features of the modules with instructional design principles based on theories of learning and experimental evidence from other research.

Complete Chapter List

Search this Book:
Reset