Do Jamaican Principals' Leadership Styles Correlate to Violence in School?

Do Jamaican Principals' Leadership Styles Correlate to Violence in School?

Jerome Miller-Vaz (University of the West Indies – Open Campus, Jamaica)
Copyright: © 2017 |Pages: 25
DOI: 10.4018/978-1-5225-1700-9.ch004
OnDemand PDF Download:
$30.00
List Price: $37.50

Abstract

The increase of violence among young people in the high school environment has become a concern among parents and educators alike. A study was designed to address whether there is a relationship between the leadership styles of principals and violence in secondary schools in rural Jamaica. Based on a correlational design survey of 414 teachers from 61 schools in five parishes, seven leadership styles were correlated with the amount of violence at each school. The result showed that there was a statistically significant positive correlation (r = 0.88) at the p < .05 level was observed in autocratic leadership in the Parish of St. Ann. A moderate significant correlation was recorded in St. Catherine in democratic leadership (r = -52) at the level of p < 0.01.
Chapter Preview
Top

Introduction

In 2008, the then Minister of Education, Jamaica, suggested that principals, teachers and administrators did not see security as an important function of their role in education (Jamaica Gleaner, 2008). However, Miller (2016) articulated that education has a major role to play in any society in deepening economic prosperity and in increasing social mobility. Miller (2016) further stated that for education to produce those outcomes effective leadership from governments and school principals must be in place and in sync. Miller stated, “The gap between what principals do versus what they are perceived to do is a real one, due, in part, to a lack of information about their work roles and judgements based on anecdotes and not facts” (p. 2). The question, therefore, is whether there is a relationship between the leadership styles of principal and violence in secondary schools in rural Jamaica. A research was done in 5 parishes to test whether there is a statistically significant relationship between principal’s leadership style and violence. Miliband (in Miller, 2016) described government and school principals as “either the motor of progress or its handbrake” (p. 1). Implied is that a school principal’s leadership style can drive or hinder the effectiveness of law and order in schools; law and order that can impact student and staff behaviour in a negative or positive way.

Complete Chapter List

Search this Book:
Reset