Easily Readable Braille Pattern for Reading Beginners and Variable Size Braille Printing System

Easily Readable Braille Pattern for Reading Beginners and Variable Size Braille Printing System

Takahiro Nishimura (National Institute of Special Needs Education, Japan) and Kouki Doi (National Institute of Special Needs Education, Japan)
Copyright: © 2019 |Pages: 17
DOI: 10.4018/978-1-5225-6240-5.ch015

Abstract

Braille as a means of communication for children and persons with visual impairment plays an important role in supporting their social independence. However, learning Braille is very difficult, and many persons with adventitious visual impairment who are not conversant with Braille are unable to read Braille. One likely reason behind this is that the common Braille pattern is not necessarily easy for Braille reading beginners such as persons with adventitious visual impairment. Consequently, it is necessary to quantitatively evaluate the readability of Braille patterns for Braille reading beginners and incorporate such findings in Braille design. Moreover, suitable Braille printers are also required to precisely reproduce easily readable Braille patterns. This chapter describes experiments to evaluate the effect of paper-based Braille on Braille pattern readability and introduces a variable size Braille printing system for printing Braille patterns from the experiments to be easily readable by Braille reading beginners unfamiliar with Braille reading.
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Background

Ever since the six-dot style code for alphabet developed by Louis Braille in 1825 was adopted for Japanese alphabets by Kuraji Ishikawa in 1890, Braille has played a significant role in Japan as a support tool for children and persons with visual impairment. Presently, Braille is used in reading and writing at one’s own pace by children and persons with visual impairment, as well as in a wide range of printed materials such as Braille text books and Braille books.

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