Educating and Training Organizational Knowledge Workers in Evaluating and Managing Intangible and Knowledge-Based Assets in the Knowledge Economy

Educating and Training Organizational Knowledge Workers in Evaluating and Managing Intangible and Knowledge-Based Assets in the Knowledge Economy

Ezra Ondari-Okemwa (University of Fort Hare, South Africa)
DOI: 10.4018/978-1-4666-1969-2.ch012
OnDemand PDF Download:
$30.00
List Price: $37.50

Abstract

This chapter discusses the importance of training workers about the intangible assets in a knowledge economy, the nature of intangible assets, how they are different from other assets, and the concepts of a knowledge workforce in a knowledge economy. It is apparent that many organizations are engaging the services of knowledge workers, but such organizations do not provide enabling environments for these workers to be fully productive. This chapter looks at the relevance of training knowledge workers in identifying intangible assets for creating value and enhancing competitiveness and innovation in a knowledge economy. Given that it has always been difficult to gather the prerequisite information to manage such assets and create value from them, the chapter discusses the nature of intangible assets, the characteristics of a knowledge economy, and the role of knowledge workers in a knowledge economy. Training and education of knowledge workers must not be taken for granted. The chapter also discusses how training and education of knowledge workers may enhance their ability in identifying intangible assets in relation to capturing the value of such assets, the transfer of intangible assets to other owners, and the challenges of managing organizational intangible assets. In a knowledge economy, knowledge workers play a central role in managing and evaluating intangible and knowledge-based assets.
Chapter Preview
Top

Introduction

With the rapid transition to the knowledge economy, workers categorized as knowledge workers are increasingly assuming crucial roles. In the knowledge economy, knowledge workers constitute an important part of a firm’s intangible assets and form key sources of competitive advantages. Many are those who work as knowledge workers but have not been specifically trained as knowledge workers. The central issue is how organizations may develop appropriate training and education programmes and strategies for knowledge workers so as to attract and retain them, maximize their performance, and therefore enhance the intellectual capital of profit and nonprofit organizations in the knowledge economy. The section which follows discusses the concept of a “knowledge economy” and how such an economy differs from other economies such the industrial economy and the agricultural economy.

Complete Chapter List

Search this Book:
Reset