Education Abroad Co-Curricular Experiences That Result in Intercultural Responsive Leadership Growth

Education Abroad Co-Curricular Experiences That Result in Intercultural Responsive Leadership Growth

Teresa E. Simpson (Lamar University, USA) and Lee H. Grimes (Tarrant County College, USA)
DOI: 10.4018/978-1-7998-4108-1.ch008
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Abstract

Simpson supported that The American Association of Colleges and Universities (AACU) and their joint effort with the American Council on Education and the federal government have found that study abroad has a huge impact on a students' development as globally diversity-minded citizens. Study abroad improves many intellectual attitudes and skills. Collaboration between co-curricular involvements, diverse experiences, integrated learning experiences, intent study abroad, the first-year experience, and others are critical strategic initiatives that impact students' development and their global awareness.
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Introduction

Simpson (2014) supported that The American Association of Colleges and Universities (AACU) and their joint effort with American Council on Education and the federal government have found that study abroad has a huge impact on a students’ development as a globally diverse minded citizen. Study abroad improves many intellectual attitudes and skills. Collaboration between co-curricular involvements, diverse experiences, integrated learning experiences, intent study abroad, the first year experience and others are a critical strategic initiatives that impact student development for their global awareness (Salisbury, An, & Pascarella, 2013).

Across educational institutions in America there is a need to prepare students more adequately for the challenges of an increased global workforce. The American Association of College and Universities echo this sentiment and discovered that there is a relationship between service learning and study abroad that will allow for a more successful student after college (Hart, 2010). Employers want a global and civic-minded leader for their company. Yet little resources are there to allow for the demand employers are requesting this. What AACU did was to find that it is more promising that engagement strategies with college campus and service learning is on the rise for the under graduate curriculum. Even more promising is that more study aboard programs are being integrated into such co-curriculum courses thus creating a globally developed and mature graduate (Engberg & Fox, 2011).

Recognizing the importance of preparing graduates for a global world is critical for today’s economy. According to Reade et al. (2013), developing globally competent citizens has become the “foremost strategic priority for higher education” (p. 100). Leaders in higher education institutions have become more focused on developing globally competent students who are not only more marketable, but who are also better prepared to make positive contributions to a global society and who will build a sustainable world (Altbach, Reisberg, & Rumbley, 2010; Heyl, 2014; Patterson, Carrillo, & Salinas, 2012; Reade et al., 2013). Preparing students to be productive global citizens is no longer a choice, but “a necessity and a moral imperative” (Galinova, 2015, p. 17). So, how do we get there? How do we prepare students to be proactive global leaders in their communities and professions?

Global activity, including study abroad programs, is a key means of transforming students from parochialism in experience, action, and mindset to the recognition of a shared humanity among the people of the world. However, we should not view internationalization as narrowly as study abroad. To cultivate global activity on our campus and encourage our students to become global leaders, higher education institutions must go beyond the boundaries of serving international students at home, investing in study abroad programs, and creating campuses in other parts of the world (Hawawini, 2011). We must globalize curriculum here and abroad.

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Background

There are five distinct yet interrelated global components that will direct an educational establishment towards a Comprehensive Internationalization Strategy. Campus units, in consultation with faculty, staff and administration, can decide which of the global components best serve their constituents.

Key Terms in this Chapter

Study Away: A part of the college experience where co-curricular studies are made that applies classroom theory to real world context through travels outside of a students’ host region.

Study Abroad: A part of the college experience where co-curricular studies are made that applies classroom theory to real world context through travels outside of a students’ host country.

Freshman Interest Groups: A global campus environment, interdisciplinary courses and interest groups focused on global issues, and inclusive study abroad opportunities.

Social Responsibility: Defined as intercultural competence, knowledge of civic responsibility, and the ability to engage effectively in regional, national, and global communities.

Cross-Cultural Communication: People from differing cultural backgrounds communicate in various ways such as languages and methods.

Cultural Leadership Skillset: Skills can then be transferred and applied to the leader’s current organization to enhance the educational cultural experience.

Cross-Disciplinary Faculty Members: Faculty members that collaborate with other departments for instruction and co-curricular initiatives.

Multiculturalism: The advancement in the understanding of human differences and cultures.

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