Effortless Data Capture for Ambient E-Services with Digital Pen and Paper Technology

Effortless Data Capture for Ambient E-Services with Digital Pen and Paper Technology

Leili Lind (Linköping University & Santa Anna IT Research Institute, Sweden), Aseel Berglund (Saab Aerosystems, Sweden), Erik Berglund (Linköping University & Santa Anna IT Research Institute, Sweden), Magnus Bång (Linköping University & Santa Anna IT Research Institute, Sweden) and Sture Hägglund (Linköping University & Santa Anna IT Research Institute, Sweden)
DOI: 10.4018/978-1-61520-843-2.ch002
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Abstract

In order to counteract the digital divide and to enable the society to reach all its citizens with various kinds of e-services, there is a need to develop access methods and terminal technologies suited also for groups with weak access to the Internet, not the least elderly and people needing care in their homes. In this chapter, the authors will describe technologies for using digital pen and paper as data input media for e-services and computing applications, refer a number of applications together with studies and evaluations of their usability, and finally comment upon future prospects for integrating digital pen and paper as an effortless technique for data capture, especially in order to counteract and diminish the digital divide. The use of digital pen and paper technologies is exemplified with applications demonstrating its appropriateness in home care for elderly, for free-form recording of data on paper such as maps, and as a remote control for a TV set or other electronic appliances with rich functionality in the home.
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Background

Throughout the history of computing, there has been an interest in using some kind of pen or stylus for convenient input of data, relying on skills and habits familiar to the ordinary user. Several technologies for recording and transmitting what is written have been tried, also for home applications (Venkatesh, 1996). We will in this chapter shortly review and assess the main solutions available and in particular discuss experience of using a “digital” pen for writing on ordinary paper as a means for effortless data capture in everyday applications. This area bears the promise of uniting the paper-based and digital worlds (Schreiner, 2008).

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