Embedding Career Competencies in Learning and Talent Development: Career Management and Professional Development Modules

Embedding Career Competencies in Learning and Talent Development: Career Management and Professional Development Modules

Sue Mulhall (Dublin Institute of Technology, Ireland) and Mark Campbell (Open University, Ireland)
DOI: 10.4018/978-1-5225-2820-3.ch005
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Abstract

The chapter researches theoretical positions and practical applications that enable educationalists to equip students with the knowledge and skills to self-manage their careers and develop professionally, thus facilitating the successful transition of students from the academic environment to the workplace. It locates the discussion within a context which recognises the different models that business schools can adopt when providing learning and talent development generally, and career and professional development specifically. The main focus of the chapter relates to three inter-related themes that underpin career management and professional development. First, situating career management and professional development within a contextualising discourse. Second, exploring the contemporary career concepts that influence career management and professional development. Third, considering career management and professional development from three varying perspectives. Issues and solutions are offered to educationalists through the integration of theory and practice.
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Background: Educational Context To Learning And Talent Development

Connecting learning and talent development theory and practice, particularly in the domains of career management and professional development, tends to fall under the remit of a business school. It has been suggested that the activities of a business school can be conceived in terms of how it balances two binaries – its teaching and research agendas; and its organisational and scholarly impact (Starkey & Tiratsoo, 2007). This leads to a four-fold typology with a quartet of potential models and associated orientations that a business school can embrace when teaching learning and talent development generally, and career management and professional development specifically:

  • The social science position (high research agenda, high scholarly impact), which is an approach that centres on the contribution to knowledge.

  • The liberal arts position (high teaching agenda, high scholarly impact), which is an approach that attends to the practice and application of the fundamentals of knowledge, self-knowledge, wisdom and leadership.

  • The professional school position (high teaching agenda, high organisational impact), which is an approach that concentrates on the improvement of management practice.

  • The knowledge economy position (high research agenda, high organisational impact), which is an approach that stresses the advancement of management knowledge.

These four models present business schools with prospective pathways to fulfil their distinct purposes, diverse means to achieve their strategic foci and greater opportunities to influence the academic, social and economic worlds in which they operate (Ivory et al., 2006). The approaches offer a range of options, as business schools can choose where the emphasis lies on the two binaries (agendas and impact) in the teaching and learning of career management and professional development.

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