An Empirical Effort to Validate Electronic-Government Adoption Model

An Empirical Effort to Validate Electronic-Government Adoption Model

Mahmud Akhter Shareef (McMaster University, Canada), Vinod Kumar (Carleton University, Canada) and Uma Kumar (Carleton University, Canada)
DOI: 10.4018/978-1-60960-601-5.ch008
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Abstract

This chapter then organizes results obtained from statistical analysis and interprets the findings. Finally, the chapter presents EG adoption models for different levels of service maturity. The five sections of the chapter with sub-sections present the theoretical design, methodology, analysis, discussion, and conclusion of the study.
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1. Theoretical Design

To discover the plausible factors affecting adoption of EG by citizens at different levels of service maturity, we have used the adoption model of EG by citizens (GAM) proposed by Shareef et al. (2011). The authors developed this model from an extensive literature review and theory analysis related to EG, information and communications technology (ICT), E-commerce (EC), psychology, sociology, and marketing and validated it in Canada, a leading country in adopting EG. We used the same questionnaire used by Shareef et al. (2011) to validate the GAM-S and GAM-I models. These two models represent the adoption models for EG at the static stage (where users can only view government information and download forms, which is one-way communication) and interaction stage (where users can interact with government by sending e-mails for any inquiry or chat, two-way communication). We borrowed the definitions of dependent variable adoption from Shareef et al. (2011).

Adoption is “the decision to accept and use an EG system to view and/or collect information, and/or download forms, and/or interact with, and/or seek government services, and/or search for queries, and/or transact to pay for different government services as the user requires with positive perception of receiving competitive advantages”.

Adoption 1: “Decision to accept and use an EG system to view, collect information, and/or download forms for different government services as the user requires with the positive perception of receiving a competitive advantage”.

Adoption 2: “Decision to accept and use an EG system to interact with, and seek government services, and/or search for queries for different government services as the user requires with the positive perception of receiving a competitive advantage”.

All the exogenous and endogenous variables of the primary model (Shareef et al., 2011; shown in Figure 1) were operationalized through the questionnaire used in the same study. Shareef et al. (2011) selected the scale items of the two phases of adoption in the following way:

Figure 1.

Primary Adoption Model for E-Government (Shareef et al., 2011)

  • a.

    Three items are selected from the Static or Publishing stage where tasks are related to only viewing and collecting information and downloading forms under Adoption 1.

  • b.

    Three items are selected from the Interactive stage where two-way communication has been established, such as e-mail, chat room, request for information, and statements under Adoption 2.

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2. Methodology

This study has been conducted in New York City, USA, using the residents of the city. We selected this venue for the following purposes:

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