Entrepreneurship, Information Technologies, and Educational-Based Virtuous Circles in Post-Industrialized Economies

Entrepreneurship, Information Technologies, and Educational-Based Virtuous Circles in Post-Industrialized Economies

José Manuel Saiz-Álvarez (Nebrija University, Spain)
DOI: 10.4018/978-1-4666-4233-1.ch016
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Abstract

Information Technologies are transforming traditional educational models based on new communication skills. Using a comparative analysis, the scope of this work is two-fold: (1) to study the importance of entrepreneurship and R&D in tertiary education and (2) to analyze which conditions must change in order to contribute to adopt this new IT-based model by the more traditional countries or university institutions that do not research, arguing they are focused on short-term goals only. Using a single OLS econometric model, the author demonstrates that R&D in companies and universities, both public and private, are complementary, R&D applied in education guarantees future positive externalities and creates IT educational societies, while globalization favors capital and human resources mobility, not only nationally but also internationally.
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Culture, Schooling, And It

High competition among corporations in a global economy context is changing labor markets worldwide. Brand new technologies diminish time and efforts to produce and to augment efficiency patterns. In order to be correctly implemented a constant study is needed, so education is necessary to permit new knowledge to be absorbed by individuals. As a result, lack of education can increase the existing gap in our societies among well-educated workers (who can be specialized) and scarcely or not-educated ones. No capital formation finishes in creating social problems in the long term, as it is currently seen in Third World societies.

As a result, a constant up-to-date capital formation is necessary to foster higher productivity. Learning-by-doing techniques permit companies to maintain a privilege position in the sector they compete. Constant education is the key for competition as it augments profits in the long run. Higher efficiency, better educated and even over-prepared white collar workers, necessarily connected with well-paid jobs, are needed to succeed.

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