EPortfolio Use in Africa

EPortfolio Use in Africa

Hédia Mhiri Sellami (University of Tunis, Tunisia)
DOI: 10.4018/978-1-4666-0143-7.ch007

Abstract

Electronic portfolios have become more popular in the wider community as learning tools, knowledge retention mechanisms, and forms of assessment (Lougheed, 2005). Researchers propose different structures for the ePortfolio. To examine the extent of portfolio use in Africa, the author conducted an experiment using google.com with four results that were less illuminating than originally hoped. Although this kind of experiment is not a rigorous one, it points to the range of significance of portfolios in Africa in relation to other places.
Chapter Preview
Top

Introduction

Portfolios have been used for many years by artists, painters, and architects to present their best achievements. Electronic portfolios have become more popular in the wider community; however, as learning tools, knowledge retention mechanisms, and forms of assessment (Lougheed, 2005). Although ePortfolios are defined differently, the definition by Scott Wilson is useful: “An ePortfolio is a repository of information about a particular learner provided by the learner and by other people and organizations, including products in a range of media that the learner has created or helped to create alongside formal documents from authoritative sources, such as transcripts of assessed achievement, which the learner has chosen to retain” (Zubizarreta, 2009).

Researchers propose different structures for the ePortfolio. A commonly used structure is proposed by the Association for Supervision and Curriculum Development (Wade, 2005). This structure includes three sub-ePortfolios:

  • 1.

    The learning sub-portfolio (also known as a “process” or “working” portfolio) shows the student’s progress in knowledge acquisition. It may contain works in progress, may track student learning over time, and may be temporary because students move on to either an assessment or presentation portfolio. The creation of this sub-ePortfolio is a reflective exercise designed to promote learning. This type of portfolio is primarily a device for teacher and learner to assess skills, reflect upon one’s learning, and establish new learning plans (Barrett, 2005).

  • 2.

    The assessment sub-portfolio (also known as an “accountability” or evaluation portfolio) supports evaluation by teachers. It provides evidence of learning and of measurable outcomes useful for faculty evaluators. The student writes a brief designed to prove that learning has taken place.

  • 3.

    The presentation sub-portfolio (also known as a “showcase” or “marketing” portfolio) exhibits the student’s best work. It is generally used to illustrate the level of accomplishment that the student has attained. Students often use this portfolio during college applications or for professional employment purposes (Barrett, 2005).

Complete Chapter List

Search this Book:
Reset