Evaluating the Perceived Fit Between E-Books and Academic Tasks

Evaluating the Perceived Fit Between E-Books and Academic Tasks

John D'Ambra (School of Information Systems, Technology and Management, University of New South Wales, Australia), Concepción S. Wilson (School of Information Systems, Technology and Management, University of New South Wales, Australia) and Shahriar Akter (School of Management and Marketing, University of Wollongong, Australia)
Copyright: © 2015 |Pages: 10
DOI: 10.4018/978-1-4666-5888-2.ch223
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Background

For the purposes of the current research, we define e-books as:

... the electronic equivalent of a printed book converted into digital format which can be displayed on a computer through network services and/or read on a personal computer or handheld device known as e-book readers. Often using specialized proprietary software, e-books may include specific features such as embedded hyperlinks, bookmarks, annotation, text searching, cross reference functions and linking complex multimedia objects. (Adapted from Anuradha & Usha, 2006, p. 49)

Key Terms in this Chapter

Textbook: A printed instructional book used by students and academics for course/personal instruction.

Information Systems: Computer or non-computer systems designed and built to meet the information needs of users of the system.

Task-Technology Fit: The perceived fit between a technology and a task.

E-Reader: A mobile electronic smart device on which an e-book can be displayed and read.

E-books: The electronic equivalent of a printed book converted into digital format, which can be displayed on a computer through network services and/or read on a personal computer or handheld device known as e-book readers. Often using specialized proprietary software, e-books may include specific features such as embedded hyperlinks, bookmarks, annotation, text searching, cross reference functions and linking complex multimedia objects.

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