An Extended Trust Building Model: Comparing Experiential and Non-Experiential Factors

An Extended Trust Building Model: Comparing Experiential and Non-Experiential Factors

D. Harrison McKnight (Michigan State University, USA) and Norman L. Chervany (University of Minnesota, USA)
Copyright: © 2007 |Pages: 24
DOI: 10.4018/978-1-59904-286-2.ch008
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Abstract

This study examines a model of factors influencing system troubleshooter trust in their supervisors, contrasting experiential and nonexperiential factors. System troubleshooters keep important organizational systems operating. Traditional research suggests that trust forms through interactional experience. Recent research indicates that initial interpersonal trust develops through nonexperiential factors that are dispositional (individual differences-related) or institutional (structural/ situational). This chapter combines initial and experiential factors to see which remain effective over time. We found that both institutional and dispositional factors affected troubleshooter trust in the supervisor even after parties gained experience with each other. Quality of experience with the supervisor affected interpersonal trust, while quantity of experience did not. Surprisingly, institutional trust, an initial trust factor, predicted trusting beliefs as strongly as did quality of experience. The study shows that both experiential and nonexperiential factors are important to troubleshooter trust even after parties know each other well.

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