Facilitation of Technology-Supported Communities of Practice

Facilitation of Technology-Supported Communities of Practice

Halbana Tarmizi (University of Nebraska at Omaha, USA) and Gert-Jan de Vreede (University of Nebraska at Omaha, USA and Delft University of Technology, The Netherlands)
Copyright: © 2008 |Pages: 7
DOI: 10.4018/978-1-59904-000-4.ch042
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Abstract

Communities of practice (CoP) has gained on prominence since it emerged as a concept in early 1990s, introduced by Lave and Wenger (1991) as situated learning. They argue that knowledge is acquired through active participation in a community as a new member moves from peripheral to full participation in the community. Since then, the CoP concept has evolved (Kimble & Hildreth, 2004), as Wenger (2004) defined CoP as “groups of people who share a passion for something that they know how to do, and who interact regularly in order to learn how to do it better” (p. 2).

Key Terms in this Chapter

Knowledge Management: A process through which organizations create, store, and utilize their collective knowledge.

Facilitator Role: Different roles that a facilitator can take in performing his or her tasks in the community.

E-Collaboration: Collaboration among individuals engaged in a common task using electronic technologies.

Group Support Systems: Integrated computer based systems that facilitate the solution of semi-structured or unstructured group problems.

Facilitation: Activities carried out to help groups achieve its own outcomes

Communities of Practice: Groups of people who share a passion for something that they know how to do, and who interact regularly in order to learn how to do it better.

Border Crossing: Activities pertaining to the community involving individuals outside the community.

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