Faculty Perceptions and Participation in Distance Education: Pick Fruit From the Low-Hanging Branches

Faculty Perceptions and Participation in Distance Education: Pick Fruit From the Low-Hanging Branches

Kim E. Dooley (Texas A & M University, USA) and Jane Magill (Texas A & M University, USA)
Copyright: © 2002 |Pages: 18
DOI: 10.4018/978-1-930708-20-4.ch005
OnDemand PDF Download:
$37.50

Abstract

Motivating faculty members to teach at a distance has been a challenge for most colleges and universities. What will be the impact of teaching using technology on faculty responsibility? Is teaching students through any or all distance education methods really nothing more than adapting traditional classroom approaches? What are the attitudes and barriers to using technologies often associated with distance education? In this chapter the authors present data obtained from an extensive survey of faculty opinions on teaching at a distance, as well as several case studies describing incentives and training made available for distance education. To enhance participation in distance education, faculty must have the competence, attitude that distance education is important and valuable, and infrastructure available to facilitate the additional time and effort to convert courses. Faculty training programs cannot be “one-shot” and should include personnel in close proximity to faculty, preferable on their own equipment. Release time is an important incentive to encourage participation.

Complete Chapter List

Search this Book:
Reset