Final Framework for a Successful Business Incubator for Indonesian Public Universities: The Influence of Information Technology on Business Incubator Success

Final Framework for a Successful Business Incubator for Indonesian Public Universities: The Influence of Information Technology on Business Incubator Success

Lina Gozali (Universitas Tarumanagara, Indonesia), Maslin Masrom (Universiti Teknologi Malaysia, Malaysia), Teuku Yuri Zagloel (University of Indonesia, Indonesia), Habibah Norehan Haron (Universiti Teknologi Malaysia, Malaysia), Jose Arturo Garza-Reyes (Derby University, UK) and Benny Tjahjono (Centre for Business in Society, Coventry University, UK)
DOI: 10.4018/978-1-7998-1879-3.ch004

Abstract

Universities have a meaningful function in motivating young graduates to become entrepreneurs in the technology field. Still, Indonesia has an unemployment issue for people's welfare. Indonesia has many potential markets. The first objective of the research is to investigate the indicators and success factors of business incubators in Indonesian public universities. Second is to examine the critical factors that influence the success of business incubators in the Indonesian public universities The third is to propose and develop successful business incubators in Indonesian public universities, and fourth is to measure the influence of IT and e-commerce assistance factor to the success of the university business incubator. The results indicated that there are four significant success factors (i.e., information technology and e-commerce assistance – abilities of business incubator, mentoring and networking, funding and support, and university regulation) with the moderating factors of age of facility, credit and rewards, and good infrastructure system.
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2. Conceptual Framework And Hypotheses

The initial framework by Campbell, Kendrick and Samuelson (1985) emerged with the simple business incubator services and facilities. The business incubator framework started with entry criteria, selection process, funding, and mentoring-networking for tenant business growth.

Smilor (1987) introduced a non-profit business incubator framework whose model implicates the tenant business mission, such as economic development, successful product, tenant’s profit, technology diversification, and job creation. Smilor’s framework involved support system (i.e. administration, facilities, and business expertise), universities and the government. His work was probably the most extensive in ascertaining and elaborating the different elements of an incubation system.

Campbell (1989) introduced the new incubation process model consisting of pre-incubation process, entry criteria and selection process, monitoring and controlling processes. The previous models by Campbell et al. (1985) and Smilor (1987) had not introduced the processes and activities from the pre-incubation and incubation processes until successful outcomes were achieved.

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