Gender Economics: An Introduction to Contemporary Gender Economics

Gender Economics: An Introduction to Contemporary Gender Economics

Susanne Moore (The Centre for Gender Economics and Innovation, Australia)
Copyright: © 2015 |Pages: 26
DOI: 10.4018/978-1-4666-8611-3.ch001
OnDemand PDF Download:
$30.00
List Price: $37.50

Abstract

This chapter will introduce a definition of the theory of Gender Economics to create a development pathway for the future study of Gender Economics as a concept. The definition covers Gender Economics and its application in business at a micro level, as well as in policy and economic theory at a macro level. This chapter introduces Diversity Economics, a concept that looks at leveraging innovation and performance from diversity. This chapter firstly defines four major categories of economic activity where this author believes that gender, and particularly women, plays a role, i.e. Investment, Policy, Environment, Innovation and Health. Secondly this chapter details examples from three of the category definitions of Gender Economics.
Chapter Preview
Top

Introduction

This chapter is an Introduction to the concepts of Gender Economics and as such, forms a brief overview of the proposed field of Gender Economics by first defining four major areas of economic activity where this author believes that gender, and particularly women, plays a role. The following categories and sub-categories form the scope of the theory of Gender Economics and highlights areas where further research can be developed. These are defined below;

Policy: Gendered Policy Formation

  • 1.

    The economic impact of gendered policy formation

  • 2.

    History of gendered policy formation – understanding how government policy has been formed and its links to economic modeling,

  • 3.

    The cost of conflict and inequity to business – Diversity Economics at an organizational level,

  • 4.

    Economic modeling theories and gendered assumptions – What do economists have to say about gender,

  • 5.

    Activism – how is the rise of activism, including feminism, anti feminist movements, as well as masculinist and anti statism movements influence culture and identifies what maybe the impacts of resultant gendered policy for men and women,

  • 6.

    Global policy creation and women of the world – gendered assumptions in global policy and how women are making a difference,

  • 7.

    The intersection of race, ethnicity, and gendered identities – how policy formation can degrade the economic rights and freedoms of some minority groups.

Investment: Investment and Economic Empowerment

  • 1.

    Economic empowerment for women – women influencing through increasing education on investment processes, (Female investment), increasing women’s sphere of influence through financial management, and education that leads to increased financial sustainability that includes the impact of poverty and economic growth by giving women greater access to capital.

  • 2.

    Investment in women – Women owned enterprises, women entrepreneurs, women in international business environments,

  • 3.

    Diversity Economics – Understanding gender diversity and its impact on organizational performance, strategies for realizing benefits, flexibility and the ‘new business transformation’,

  • 4.

    Labor force participation – The impact of females on GDP (Gross Domestic Product) in Australia and globally, increasing female labor force participation;

  • 5.

    Equity in decision making, women on boards, quotas and targets, the ramifications of disrupted working lives and return to work strategies,

  • 6.

    The degradation of women’s rights – putting a spotlight on current political activism that has the potential to degrade the rights of women as well as men and developing positive solutions for change.

Environment: Environment and Sustainability

  • 1.

    Collaborating in sustainability – Case Studies demonstrating diversity of thought in environmental sustainability, women in agriculture and the environment, reimagining community,

  • 2.

    Media – Community consciousness and media, how economics drives media and vice versa,

  • 3.

    Gender Exploitation – The treatment of gender as Capital and how its exploitation impacts society and safe workplaces for women,

  • 4.

    Human trafficking and violence against women – the Costs of human trafficking, gender interventions, the spread of HIV and other related disease and its economic and human cost.

Key Terms in this Chapter

Pitch Sessions: A term used in the capital raising community and is the practice of presenting or ‘pitching’ your business idea to investors. Pitch sessions are used by capital raising companies to attract an investor for a start up venture or company going through ‘rounds’ of investment raising.

Right to Life: A term used by anti abortionists that focuses on the rights of the unborn baby.

Gender Pay Gap: Sometimes referred to as the ‘Wage gap’, this gap represents the difference between average salaries for men and women who do the same work.

Planned Parenthood: A term used by advocates of woman’s right to affordable contraception, and pro-choice family planning and health care facilities which may include access to abortion clinics.

Everywoman: Described by this author as the average women who may want to invest in stocks and shares or other forms of saving and investments but have neither the financial capital nor the knowledge. The Everywoman does not include sophisticated investors and often the Everywoman cannot even gain access to the share market as a retail investor because the entry requirements in terms of the investment amount or ‘at risk saving’ is too high.

Gender Stereotyping: The categorization of persons’ role in society on the basis of a belief of what one’s sex dictates that role and that sex’s attributes should be.

Diversity Economics™: Describes the economic impact or profit impact of leveraging diversity in an organizational context. Refers to Diversity management, its effectiveness and its impact on the organization. The term Diversity Economics™ is Trademarked and copyright to Susanne Moore 2012.

Carbon Tax Repeal: The Australian Federal Government introduced a Carbon Tax under the Gillard, Labour Government which applied to companies whose direct emissions exceeded a legislated annual threshold. These companies were required to pay a ‘carbon tax’ in an effort to tax large polluters of green house emissions and to reduce Australia’s carbon footprint. Under pressure the incoming Liberal government disbanded the bill to take effect from 17 July 2014.

Superannuation Guarantee: The compulsory system of superannuation support for Australian employees, paid for by employers. The system was introduced in 1992.

Masculinist: A person who believes that men are superior to women and advocates male superiority. Masculinist Groups form to ‘defend’ what they see as a degradation of male rights as women gain parity and can often be anti feminist.

Complete Chapter List

Search this Book:
Reset