Gender Impact on Adult Education

Gender Impact on Adult Education

Lesley S. J. Farmer (California State University - Long Beach, USA)
DOI: 10.4018/978-1-61692-906-0.ch023
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Abstract

As society becomes more pluralistic, it behooves adult education to understand how gender intersects adult education so that equitable means of learning and teaching can empower all adults. In order to address gender issues in technology-enhanced adult education, the contributing factors of developmental learning need to be examined. Gendered learning has both biological and social constructs, which impact experiences in adulthood. Adult education needs to help learners re-negotiate their personal and social identities. In the process, educators can help students learn different ways to interact socially as well. Several gender-linked issues impact adult education; for example teaching across generations has a new twist because of socially-contextualized technology. In providing distance education, adult educators need to incorporate gender-sensitive resources, learning activities, technical issues, student-teacher relations, and assessment. Twenty-first century trends of changing economies, global interaction and interdependent literacies can help both genders learn optimally.
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Background

In order to address gender issues in technology-enhanced adult education, the contributing factors of developmental learning need to be examined. Gendered learning has both biological and social constructs, which impact experiences in adulthood.

Key Terms in this Chapter

Collaboration: The process of sharing resources and responsibilities to create shared meaning and attain a common goal; interdependent cooperation.

Socialization: The process of adopting the behavior patterns of the surrounding culture.

Distance Education: An educational delivery system that offers remote access: correspondence courses, videotape courses, and online instruction are typical means.

Web 2.0: Interactive Web; enables people to collaborate and share online.

Courseware: An online application that allows course elements (e.g., content, communication, grading) to be “packaged” together.

E-Learning: electronic or online-based learning.

Expectations: Assumptions about predicted behaviors.

Gender Equity: A social condition whereby males and females have the same opportunities and constraints in participating in and contributing to society.

Globalization: The process of integrating regions via communications and economics.

Instructional Design: A systematic analysis of training needs and the development of aligned instruction.

Millennials: The generation born since 1980.

Empowerment: Process of giving or enabling another person to have power or authority.

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