The General Theory of Crime and Computer Hacking: Low Self-Control Hackers?

The General Theory of Crime and Computer Hacking: Low Self-Control Hackers?

Adam M. Bossler (Georgia Southern University, USA) and George W. Burruss (University of Missouri-St. Louis, USA)
Copyright: © 2012 |Pages: 29
DOI: 10.4018/978-1-61350-323-2.ch707
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Abstract

Though in recent years, a number of studies have been completed on hackers’ personality and communication traits by experts in the fields of psychology and criminology, a number of questions regarding this population remain. Does Gottfredson and Hirschi’s concept of low self-control predict the unauthorized access of computer systems? Do computer hackers have low levels of self-control, as has been found for other criminals in mainstream society? If low self-control can predict the commission of computer hacking, this finding would seem to support the generality argument of self-control theory and imply that computer hacking and other forms of cybercrime are substantively similar to terrestrial crime. This chapter focuses on the results of a study where we examined whether Gottfredson and Hirschi’s general theory of crime is applicable to computer hacking in a college sample.

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