Going Towards Adaption, Integration, and Co-Creation: A Conclusion to Developing Creative Problem Solving Skills in Higher Education

Going Towards Adaption, Integration, and Co-Creation: A Conclusion to Developing Creative Problem Solving Skills in Higher Education

Chunfang Zhou (Aalborg University, Denmark)
DOI: 10.4018/978-1-5225-0643-0.ch024
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Abstract

As a response to the growing challenges brought about by complexity in professional practice, the collection of chapters in this volume guides an intellectual journey through the various theoretical perspectives, research methods and pedagogical models with a focus on developing creative problem solving skills in higher education. Based on an overview of topics in this volume, this chapter aims to draw a conclusion about future research directions from present contributions. It could be an extended journey with the intention of helping the audience to locate the ideas presented in this volume within a framework constructed by the three main themes of adaption, integration and co-creation. This lays a stepping-stone in paving the way of pedagogical development and research prospects.
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Adaption

The term ‘adaption’ has been very much discussed in relation to the adaption-innovation inventory developed by Kirton (1976, 1982, 1994). Adaptors and innovators are two creative styles, but are equally creative. The adaptors choose to do things better, while innovators choose to do things differently. Adaptors operate within a structured system associated with sufficiency of originality, efficiency, and rule-group conformity, whereas innovators break away from such an existing structured system and show great interest in originality of ideas and less concern with efficiency and rule-group conformity (Ee & Tan, 2009). Furthermore, Kirton (1994) suggested that adaptors are likely to improve on the existing structure and favor staying in groups, maintaining cohesion by following the accepted ways, and solving problems in a disciplined, methodical, and predictable manner, while innovators are risk takers and are likely to generate innovative yet practical ideas, thus altering the existing paradigm (Ee & Tan, 2009).

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