Higher Education Management

Higher Education Management

DOI: 10.4018/978-1-5225-2265-2.ch002
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Abstract

Over the last twenty years Higher Education Institutions have been subject to many changes with core elements the managerialism, the marketization, the audit and the corporatization. Tertiary education can be described as a complicated social system and for this reason it must be contemporaneous, innovative, open to changes and challenges, but also effective and efficient. The second chapter focuses on Higher Education Management components, such as: 1) Leadership appears to be the most significant factor of institutional excellence. 2) Strategic Planning helps Higher Education Institutions to be more flexible, farseeing, innovative and adaptive. 3) Marketing Management of universities can entice students, sponsors and research cooperations. 4) The effectiveness of a Higher Education Institutions depends on human resource satisfaction and on management of resources (ICT, financial, infrastructure, etc.). 5) Quality Management aims to constantly improve performance and increase customer satisfaction, and 6) Managerial activities such as measurement analysis and improvement help universities to formulate strategic plans and turn strategy into action.
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Leadership

Higher education institutions are facing new challenges such as: increasing competition and technological and cultural evolution, while at the same time they must maintain their fundamental academic and educational principles of quality (Van Ameijde et al., 2009; Smith & Hughey, 2006). According to Szekeres (2004, as cited in Jones et al., 2012), over the last twenty years higher education institutions have been subject to many changes with core elements the managerialism, the marketization, the audit and the corporatization. Leadership in higher education institutions appears to be the most significant factor of success, a mobilizer for institutional excellence (Birnbaum, 1988, as cited in Smith & Hughey, 2006). The nature of effective leadership in higher education institutions, however, seems to be ambiguous (Petrov, 2006), since the academic system hinges on the independent thought, creativity, freedom, autonomy and participation of all the people who work in the higher education institution (Spendlove, 2007). For Bryman (2009, as cited in Jones et al., 2012), even though there is not a single approach to effective leadership in higher education institutions, it is imperative for leaders to: (a) create an environment for academics in which they can fulfill their potential and their personal ambitions, (b) consult, (c) respect existing values, (d) foster collegiality, (e) encourage the fulfillment of human resources' interests, (f) be an active member of university life, (g) promote autonomy, and (h) assure the success of the institution. It is generally accepted that there is a necessity for deeper understanding and further development of effective leaders in higher education institutions (Flumerfelt & Banachowski, 2011), since the relationship between effective leadership and higher education institutions effectiveness and efficiency, has never been more articulate than it is today (Murphy & Louis, 1999; Goldring & Greenfield, 2002, as cited in Smith & Hughey, 2006).

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