Holistic, Evolving Aspects of Nonviolence for Bringing About Needed Social-Political Change and Important Practitioners of Nonviolence

Holistic, Evolving Aspects of Nonviolence for Bringing About Needed Social-Political Change and Important Practitioners of Nonviolence

Linda Groff (California State University – Dominguez Hills, USA)
DOI: 10.4018/978-1-5225-2209-6.ch013
OnDemand PDF Download:
$30.00
List Price: $37.50

Abstract

This article examines holistic, evolving aspects of nonviolence—as a goal and as the desired means for bringing about needed social-political change, whether in schools or society, along with important practitioners of nonviolence. It covers Gandhi's principled and spiritually-based nonviolence for collective social-political change (Part 1); a number of other nonviolence practitioners in the Gandhian tradition—from different countries and spiritual-religious traditions working for different goals in their respective countries (Part 2); strategic nonviolence of Gene Sharp and others (Part 3); and additional forms of working nonviolently within existing systems that have emerged since Gandhi's time (Part 4).
Chapter Preview
Top

Part I: Mahatma Gandhi’S Satyagraha Or Truth Force- The First To Use Spiritually-Based Nonviolence For Collective Social-Political Change

Introduction to the Great Significance of Gandhi’s Nonviolence

While there have always been religious leaders historically who lived lives of nonviolence, as well as important individual practitioners of nonviolence in more recent periods before Gandhi—such as Leo Tolstoy in Russia (Green, 1986; Murthy, 1987; and Tolstoy and Garnett, 2006) and Henry David Thoreau in the United States (Thoreau, 2012; and other editions of his work)--modern nonviolent movements began with Mahatma Gandhi, who was the first person who led a collective movement using nonviolence for social-political change, in Gandhi’s case first against discrimination that he experienced for being Indian in South Africa, and later when he returned to India to lead India’s movement for independence from the British Empire. (See, for example, from the many writings on Gandhi’s life: Carter, 1995; Easwaran and Flinders, 3rd Ed., 1997; Gandhi and Fischer, 2002; Gandhi and Brown, Eds., 2008; Gandhi and Mahadev, 1993; and Johnson, 2005.) All later practitioners of collective movements of principled and spiritually-based nonviolence, as part of a whole philosophy of how one lives one’s life, go back to Gandhi as their inspiration. Gandhi was nominated five times for a Nobel Peace Prize before he was murdered in 1948—an irony for someone so committed to nonviolence. (The same happened to Martin Luther King.)

Complete Chapter List

Search this Book:
Reset