Human Patient Simulations: Evaluation of Self-Efficacy and Anxiety in Clinical Skills Performance

Human Patient Simulations: Evaluation of Self-Efficacy and Anxiety in Clinical Skills Performance

Grace N. Onovo (Hostos Community College, USA)
DOI: 10.4018/978-1-5225-2237-9.ch020
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Abstract

The relationship between self-efficacy (self-confidence) and anxiety levels, and the use of Human Patient Simulations (HPS) as a teaching-learning strategy, has not been sufficiently studied in the area of clinical nursing education. The purpose of this chapter is to evaluate the self-efficacy/self-confidence and anxiety levels in clinical skills performance of undergraduate nursing students, pre-use and post-use of Human Patients Simulations (HPS), as a teaching and learning strategy in maternity nursing. The study used a quantitative, pre-experimental, one group study design with a pretest and posttest experiment in data collection. The findings concluded that HPS reduced anxiety and increased self-efficacy/self-confidence in clinical skills performance and decision-making of the participants. In addition, the study found that the participants had difficulties in tasks performance with the following action verbs associated with the cognitive domain of Bloom's taxonomy. The verbs were “identify,” “apply,” and “analyze.”
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Background

An alarming number of undergraduate nursing students have low self-efficacy and high anxiety levels in clinical skills performance despite the use of Human Patient Simulations (HPS) as a teaching-learning strategy in the nursing learning laboratory (Kameg et al., 2009; Shepherd et al., 2007; Shepherd et al., 2010; Omansky, 2010). According to Leigh (2008), National League for Nursing 2006, 2007, Nehring, 2008), the use of simulators as a teaching tool is new to the field of nursing compared to other fields of studies such as the fields of aviation, infantry, and medicine. Although a decade has passed since the beginning of the use of HPS as a teaching tool in nursing, much is still not known about the deficiencies of HPS on undergraduate nursing students' learning (Nehring, 2008, 2010). The literature indicated that self-efficacy and anxiety are barriers to students’ clinical skills performance in all areas of nursing clinical practice (White, 2003; White, 2011). Historically, a few research studies exist on the effects of HPS on self-efficacy, anxiety levels and poor clinical skills performance of the undergraduate nursing students (Laster, 2007a; National League for Nursing, 2010; Nehring & Lashley, 2004; Nehring, 2008; Waxman, 2011). This research study therefore, explored the effect of the use of HPS as a teaching strategy on the self-efficacy and anxiety levels of the third-year undergraduate nursing students enrolled in maternal and child health specialty course.

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