“I Didn't Believe Privilege Existed Before This”: Service-Learning in a Multicultural Education Course

“I Didn't Believe Privilege Existed Before This”: Service-Learning in a Multicultural Education Course

Thomas Browning (Wayne State College, USA), Scot Wilson (Indiana University – Bloomington, USA), Crystal D. Howell (Indiana University – Bloomington, USA), Alexandra M. Weiss (Indiana University – Bloomington, USA) and Kathryn E. Engebretson (Indiana University – Bloomington, USA)
DOI: 10.4018/978-1-5225-4041-0.ch022

Abstract

This chapter outlines the experiences of teacher candidates engaged in service-learning at a large Midwestern university. The authors set out to study this service partnership by asking, What benefits do teacher candidates identify from this service learning partnership? What do they see as challenges? What have they learned? In this chapter, the authors describe the answers to these questions. Obstacles to and opportunities for future development of this partnership are also discussed, and some implications for teacher educators are also outlined.
Chapter Preview
Top

Background

A review of the recent literature reveals a multitude of relevant studies that focus on the integration of service-learning within teacher education programs. The authors situated these studies into two different categories. One category the authors labeled “Service-learning as a Way to Raise Awareness of the Benefits of Teaching in Diverse Settings” and the other “Service-learning as a Way to Build Relationships and Enhance Empathy.” The authors argue this study adds to and extends these areas of research by not only confirming much of what was gleaned from the existing literature, but also adding more nuance to the ways in which teacher candidates apply course content and teaching skills in their service-learning, specifically with students who are English language learners.

Complete Chapter List

Search this Book:
Reset