Impact of Cloud of Clouds in Enterprises Applications

Impact of Cloud of Clouds in Enterprises Applications

Lavanya S. (Sri Krishna College of Engineering and Technology, India), Susila N. (Sri Krishna College of Engineering and Technology, India) and Venkatachalam K. (Sri Krishna College of Engineering and Technology, India)
Copyright: © 2019 |Pages: 13
DOI: 10.4018/978-1-5225-9023-1.ch002

Abstract

In recent times, the cloud has become a leading technology demanding its functionality in every business. According to research firm IDC and Gartner study, nearly one-third of the worldwide enterprise application market will be SaaS-based by 2018, driving annual SaaS revenue to $50.8 billion, from $22.6 billion in 2013. Downtime is treated as the primary drawback which may affect great deals in businesses. The service unavailability leads to a major disruption affecting the business environment. Hence, utmost care should be taken to scale the availability of services. As cloud computing has plenty of uncertainty with respect to network bandwidth and resources accessibility, delegating the computing resources as services should be scheduled accordingly. This chapter proposes a study on cloud of clouds and its impact on a business enterprise. It is also decided to propose a suitable scheduling algorithm to the cloud of cloud environment so as to trim the downtime problem faced by the cloud computing environment.
Chapter Preview
Top

There are two ways of computing namely heterogeneous distributed computing systems and homogenous distributed computing systems approaches are used in design of distributed systems. In addition to server heterogeneity, depending on the basic applications, outstanding burden spreading over numerous cloud clients may require tremendously unique measure of resources (CPU, memory and capacity). The heterogeneity of the two servers and remaining burden requests noteworthy specialized difficulties on resource assignment, decreasing down time and numerous sensitive issues. This paper represents thorough investigation to propose solution provable advantages that cross over any barrier between resource request and downtime decrease models.

In recent year, the new buzz word called “downtime” has become more popular in the world of business. The downtime is the biggest challenge of cloud migration followed by staying within budget, performance disruption, data loss, and security requirements.

According to recent studies, downtime costs businesses an average of $7,900 per minute, or more than $450,000 per hour, and costs all businesses in North America $700 billion every year. Data loss, meanwhile, is estimated to cost US businesses $18.2 billion per year, and enterprises around the world $1.7 trillion per year. The cloud leads a long way in reducing downtime and keeping companies online in which application downtime is costing enterprises across the globe an estimated $16 million (approximately £12.9 million) annually.

Enterprise Strategy Group (ESG) research indicated that 46% of organisations say that, in 2016, they have a “problematic shortage” of cyber security skills. Based on these figures, incident detection and responses to cloud-based cyber threats would undoubtedly be a problem for those organisations, as they have inadequate staff available to manage any cyber security risks that may arise.

The risk that every organization meets is a big challenge when encountered downtime. So why is “downtime” meant to be prioritized and important to any organization?

  • Downtime reduces productivity. Every hour down is an hour you cannot help a client.

  • Downtime has the potential for lost data. IT system crashes can cause data loss.

  • Downtime affects overall IT efficiency. If one of your systems goes down, generally everything is affected

  • Downtime can result in lost productivity, lost sales, and lost customers. It can be especially expensive and disruptive if the asset or service is relied upon by many employees or customers, such as a CRM, PoS system, or e-commerce system. Data loss can be expensive and disruptive, too, depending on what type of data is involved. Data that can be expensive to lose includes:

    • o

      Internal documentation (training manuals, policies and procedures, etc.)

    • o

      Sales and marketing documents

    • o

      Financial records

    • o

      Customer records

    • o

      IT settings files

    • o

      IT logs

    • o

      Product designs/blueprints

    • o

      Internally-developed code

Complete Chapter List

Search this Book:
Reset