Improving Occupants Comfort Through Qualitative Indoor Environments: A Case Study

Improving Occupants Comfort Through Qualitative Indoor Environments: A Case Study

Dalia Hafiz (Al Ghurair University, UAE)
DOI: 10.4018/978-1-7998-2823-5.ch018
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Abstract

Daylight is one key aspect to enhance the sense of place and influence the personal interpretation and impression that last long after leaving the place. However, visual discomfort and glare can distract architects from achieving the most of daylighting. To better achieve visual comfort in daylit space time and space dynamics of the daylight condition, the representation and re-imagining of these dynamics need to be considered. This chapter explored a selected case study that was used for application: a daylit museum located in Washington DC Metropolitan was examined for visual discomfort problems. Since museums are typically carefully lit because of the sensitivity of exhibits, this case study evaluated the daylighting condition in a museum using a series of illuminance field measurements, simulations, and views experienced by occupants along a circulation path through the space. The case study also aimed at understanding how small design changes can affect visual comfort as a tactic for case studies. A collaborative design effort was used in different stages of the case study.
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Background

When it comes to evaluative process, collaborative activities are an important application, especially. In this chapter, factors of successful collaboration studied by (Mattessich and Monsey, 1992) were examined including: a shared understood goal (achieving better interior spaces connection through the enhancement of visual comfort and light transition); multiple forms of representation (in-situ and simulation-based evaluation were used); triangulation (analysis and assessment were based on a number of metrics. Also, qualitative interview analysis and qualitative statistical evaluation took place), and collaborative decision-making (the group of members collaborates to select the evaluation metrics and the design decisions).

Immersive Case Study Method Overview

To allow for tool application, a group of purposefully selected architects and decision-makers were encouraged to apply the new tool on a selected case study space: a daylit museum located in Washington DC Metropolitan was examined for visual discomfort problems that could affect the interior spaces seamless connections. The study started by identifying primary visual discomfort zones. Illuminance and Luminance evaluation took place where high contrast was detected. Afterward, a series of design alternatives were proposed based on the initial evaluation results. For each alternative, visual comfort condition was compared with existing conditions to select an adequate alternative regarding glare controlling and visual comfort between spaces. Finally, the selected option was re-evaluated, and visual comfort conditions were compared with the as-built space conditions.

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