Improving Student Classroom Behavior Through Nonviolent Classroom Management and the Implementation of Emotional Intelligence for Educators

Improving Student Classroom Behavior Through Nonviolent Classroom Management and the Implementation of Emotional Intelligence for Educators

T. Ray Ruffin (University of Phoenix, USA & Grand Canyon University, USA & A. T. Still University, USA, & Colorado Technical University, USA), Deborah Fuqua (University of Phoenix, USA), D. Israel Lee (Southern Illinois University USA & University of Phoenix, USA), Kimberly L. Wright (University of Phoenix, USA & Medgar Evers College (CUNY), USA), Shaitaisha D. Winston (Independent Researcher, USA), Lisa Langford (University of Phoenix, USA), Tammy Jameson (Walden University, USA), Typhany V. Williams-Hanley (University of Phoenix, USA), R. Adelina Tachin (University of Phoenix, USA), Deanna Ford (University of Phoenix, USA) and Shayanna M. Whitaker (University of Phoenix, USA)
DOI: 10.4018/978-1-5225-7476-7.ch010

Abstract

This chapter explored nonviolence classroom management tools and the self-actualization of emotional intelligence (EI) focused on education in the United States (U.S.). The purpose of this chapter was to convey to educators that their attitude or behavior can negatively or positively affect student engagement and classroom management. The aim is to create an atmosphere of positive reinforcements for students to develop and grow, using EI as a tool to examine classroom behaviors. The authors discussed the behavioral problems and facets many present-day schools in the U.S. are confronted with on a daily basis. The implementation of positive behavioral interventions and supports (PBIS) as nonviolent interventions for classroom management is covered. For comparisons, research directions were explored from a universal perspective to include multinational countries. The chapter concluded with a summative conclusion to include thoughts on improving student classroom behavior through nonviolence classroom management and implementing EI for educators.
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Introduction

School disciplinary processes are for students who have violated the school rules. There are many different types of levels of offences, such as drug activity, stealing from others, fighting over a member of the opposite sex, dress code violations, cheating on tests, bringing weapons to school, pulling pranks on school grounds, or bullying. The incidents emphasized the obligation and relevance of educators working together with parents, community partners, and school staff for the betterment of the students. The implementations of proven nonviolent disciplinary strategies or interventions, such as Positive Behavioral Interventions and Supports (PBIS), to improve classroom management allow for the objective of preventing incidents such as Columbine High School and Marjory Stoneman Douglas High School from happening. Additionally, educators who are more aware of their emotions and the emotions of their students may be more effective at classroom management and at leading students toward goal accomplishment by keeping students engaged (Kang, 2017).

Educator’s behavior can negatively or positively affect student engagement and classroom management (Strati, Schmidt, & Maier, 2016). Educators having negative attitudes toward students, develop their behavior within the first few weeks of school. The negative attitudes tend to be display throughout the school year (Safran & Safran, 1985). The education system in the United States has been under attack for the poor quality of education that benefits from it, low graduation rates, ineffective educators and a multitude of other issues that hinder the system. Markow and Pieters (2011) believe that competent educators are the key to improving the education of children and is the factor that influences student’s achievement. EI model focuses on social awareness, self-awareness, self-management. This model is generally used in the business world for leadership development (Goleman, 2004).

This introduction provided to the reader an insight on school violence and disciplinary problems and how they are becoming more pervasive in our society. It also explored nonviolence classroom management tools and the self-actualization of EI focused on education in the United States (U.S.). The background of this chapter provided broad definitions and discussions about EI and PBIS as it relates to student behavior. The main focus of this chapter identifies the behavioral problems and facets that many present-day schools in the U.S. are confronted with on a daily basis, and understanding why those behavior problems exist. It mentions how the educator’s behavior may affect the student’s behaviors; to include external societal factors that also affects how students behave in the classroom.

The main focus of this chapter provides discussions about why it is important for educators to use EI in their classrooms along with PBIS, an intervention ensuring that negative behaviors are being corrected and students are on the path to achieving positive academic results. Research directions will be explored from a universal perspective to include multinational countries. The solution of PBIS as nonviolent interventions for classroom management will be covered. The recommendation of EI training for educators will be discussed also. Fundamentally, educators will become integral instruments of the nonviolent classroom management. Creating a suitable learning environment for student activity and engagement. In this chapter future research directions will be discussed as well as the theme of the book. The chapter will conclude with a summative conclusion to include thoughts on improving student classroom behavior through nonviolence classroom management and implementing EI for educators to create the future leaders of tomorrow with our students of today.

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