Individual Differences, Learning Opportunities and Learning Outcomes, Digital Equity: Bridging the Gap – Creating Learning Opportunities for All Students

Individual Differences, Learning Opportunities and Learning Outcomes, Digital Equity: Bridging the Gap – Creating Learning Opportunities for All Students

Amy L. Sedivy-Benton (University of Arkansas at Little Rock, USA)
DOI: 10.4018/978-1-4666-9577-1.ch012
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Abstract

Information and communication technologies are prevalent in almost every aspect of our world, ranging from their presence in schools to even being used by a passenger on a bus. Unfortunately, not all individuals have the same opportunity or access to these technologies, especially children who are still receiving their education. This limited opportunity creates a disparity between those who have access and those who do not, the impact goes far beyond just securing the latest device, rather it can impact their future as students. With limited access many of these children may not be career ready. Policymakers as well as institutions of education need to pay attention to the growth of these technologies as well as the infrastructure that is in place to ensure equal opportunities for all. This chapter provides an overview of what is commonly discussed when talking about digital equity and digital access in PK-12 schools. Examples of teacher implications and resources are provided, and a call for a shift in culture is present. The chapter concludes with recommendations for schools and policy-makers to consider when they begin to address the technological needs in order to prepare students for the future.

Key Terms in this Chapter

Massive Multiplayer Online Gaming (MMO or MMOG): an online video game that allows large numbers of participants simultaneously.

Massive Open Online Courses: a course that is offered online that has unlimited participation and encourages interactions between all parties involved.

Digital Access: full access to participate in society digitally.

Digital Divide: the gap between students who have access to computer technology and people who don't – commonly influenced by socio-economic status as well as locale that contribute to this disparity.

Constructivism: An approach to teaching that embraces the fact that students learn by actively participating in constructing their own knowledge.

Web 2.0: Rather than using the Internet to simply browse and find information, it shifts the control over to the user to decide how they may want to create or interact with other using the Internet.

Internet Literacy: The ability to seek out information when necessary with the utilization of the internet.

Digital Native: Individuals, born after 1980, who grew up immersed in technology and as a result possess a high level of confidence and familiarity when using technology ( Prensky, 2001a )

Digital Immigrants: Individuals, born before 1980, who grew up in a world without technology and as a result lack confidence and familiarity when using technology ( Prensky, 2001a )

Common Core State Standards (CCSS): Common Core State Standards: Common

Technology Literacy: Technology Literacy helps one to communicate, solve problems, and enhance life-long learning skills for future progress.

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