Information Seeking Models in the Digital Age

Information Seeking Models in the Digital Age

Mudasir Khazer Rather (University of Kashmir, India) and Shabir Ahmad Ganaie (University of Kashmir, India)
Copyright: © 2018 |Pages: 13
DOI: 10.4018/978-1-5225-2255-3.ch392

Abstract

A model may be defined as a structure for thinking about a problem and may evolve into a statement of the relationships among theoretical propositions. Most models of information behavior are generally the statements, often in the form of diagrams that attempt to explicate an information-seeking activity, the causes and consequences of that activity, or the relations among stages in information-seeking behavior. This chapter explores, introduces and discusses select information seeking models and explains various elements of each modal. Various online resources like database, research articles and other web tools will be accessed to retrieve relevant information related to the select models. Further, the chapter also focuses on the diagrammatic or pictorial representation of each model.
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Background

Most models of information behavior are generally the statements, often in the form of diagrams that attempt to explicate an information-seeking activity, the causes and consequences of that activity, or the relations among stages in information-seeking behavior. Behavior may be defined as the more general field of investigation with information-seeking Behavior being seen as a sub-set of the field, particularly concerned with the variety of methods people employ to discover, and gain access to information resources, and information searching Behavior being defined as a sub-set of information-seeking, particularly concerned with the interactions between information user (with or without an intermediary) and computer-based information systems.. The first model for study of Information Seeking Behavior was proposed by James Krikelas in 1983. This model suggests that the steps of information seeking process are as follows:

  • 1.

    Perceiving a need,

  • 2.

    The search,

  • 3.

    Finding the information, and

  • 4.

    Using the information which results in either satisfaction or dissatisfaction.

Key Terms in this Chapter

Information Seeking Behavior: A special case of problem solving which, includes recognizing and interpreting the information problem, establishing a plan of search, conducting the search, evaluating the results, and if necessary, iterating through the process again.

Model: A model may be defined as a structure for thinking about a perceived problem and may evolve into a statement of the relationships among theoretical propositions.

Information Literacy: The ability to know when there is a need for information, to be able to identify, locate, evaluate, and effectively use that information for the issue or problem at hand.

Information Behavior: Information behavior refers to how people approach and handle information.

Information Need: The perception of a lack of information that provokes one to develop a need for it.

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