Integrated Care as a Strategic Solution for Active Aging in the Community: Tools and Models

Integrated Care as a Strategic Solution for Active Aging in the Community: Tools and Models

Eman Leung (City University of Hong Kong, Hong Kong), Cheuk Wing Chau (City University of Hong Kong, Hong Kong), Alison Lee (City University of Hong Kong, Hong Kong), Youhua (Frank) Chen (City University of Hong Kong, Hong Kong) and Diana T. F. Lee (The Chinese University of Hong Kong, Hong Kong)
DOI: 10.4018/978-1-5225-2633-9.ch008
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Abstract

A rapidly aging population is an international challenge. Although much has been done, senior citizens today are not experiencing better health than our ancestors (WHO, 2016). This chapter reviews evidence on the current international good practices, the positive clinical and economic impact of integrated care, and how Operations Research/Management Science (OR/MS) methodologies add value to the implementation of integrated care. In the second half of the chapter, three enablers of implementing integrated care are reviewed: 1) a common technological platform, 2) service-restructuring with the introduction of new job roles and recruitment, and 3) creation of a financial model that incentivizes integrated care. In conclusion, while research has shown that integrated care is effective in fostering aging in place, challenges remain as to how it could be implemented given that population aging has increased the demands on healthcare resources. This chapter reviews how OR/MS methodologies can facilitate the implementation of integrated care.
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The Health Economics Of Integrated Care And Ways Operations Research/Management Sciences (Or/Ms) Can Add Further Value

In addition to clinical research that demonstrates the impact of integrated care on clinical outcomes, health economists and researchers in the discipline of OR/MS have also demonstrated the health economic values of integrated care, and how healthcare resources could be optimized to deliver integrated care cost-effectively and sustainably in order for the population to age in place. Research has found that hospital admission and cost associated with acute care and long-term care could be reduced if preventive or follow-up care could be provided adequately at the community beyond the walls of hospitals or long-term care institutions.

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