Interpreting Solidarity: Bilingual Teachers in New Latino South Spaces

Interpreting Solidarity: Bilingual Teachers in New Latino South Spaces

Mónica Rodríguez-Castro (University of North Carolina at Charlotte, USA), Spencer Salas (University of North Carolina at Charlotte, USA) and Jatnna Acosta (University of North Carolina at Charlotte, USA)
DOI: 10.4018/978-1-7998-3448-9.ch018

Abstract

In metro Charlotte, North Carolina, dynamic newcomer Latinx communities have changed the demographics of K-8 education as the region has emerged as a new gateway for an influx of immigrants and migrants. Today, in what has come to be known as “the New Latino South,” K-12 teachers are eager to expand their knowledge base for working with this relatively new population. To that end, bilingual (Spanish/English) educators are increasingly tapped to serve as impromptu interpreters as monolingual administrators and teachers interact more frequently with Spanish dominant communities. Drawing from an in-depth interview sequence, the chapter narrates a Dominican-American's lived experience with simultaneous K-12-based interpreting as a K-12 student teacher, and a licensed early-grades educator. This chapter theorizes the layered emotional and professional advocacy of heritage-language bilingual school-based professionals and their agency in advancing access and equity to public resources with recommendations for policy and practice.
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